Announcements

Coronavirus Update from the Rector

Dear Holy Apostles,

Grace and peace to you from God.  The consensus of the CDC and other health officials is that, along with washing your hands, social distancing is a vitally important part of mitigating the spread and severity of coronavirus (COVID-19) in our community.  Social distancing means keeping away from large gatherings and creating a wider “personal bubble” when you are out in public.  And most importantly, it means staying home and away from others when you are sick.  These steps are essential parts of taking care of ourselves as well as loving our neighbors as ourselves. 

However, the danger is that in the process of social distancing we will end up emotionally and spiritually isolating ourselves.  In other words, I worry our reactions to the COVID-19 health crisis—especially reactions that are driven by fear—will only add to one of the pandemics that has gripped our society for some time, the virulent and insidious pandemic of loneliness, isolation, and despair. 

Emotional and spiritual distancing isn’t going to help anyone.  There is, in fact, a direct link between spiritual health and physical and emotional health.  This essential connection has not diminished because there is a new and scary public health emergency.  We need to maintain our spiritual connection to God and each other.  The question is:  how do we as a church take prudent precautions against the spread of infectious disease while maintaining a sense of community and spiritual care which imbues life with meaning and makes it worth living in the first place?  This is a difficult but not impossible balance.  I wrote last week about the precautions we are taking at church including wiping down high-touch surfaces before and after services, exploring alternatives to handshakes and hugs during the Peace, and increasing the amount of hand washing that goes on before Holy Communion.  I also wrote about the sufficiency of only taking Communion in one kind, the bread.

At this time I want to reiterate what you have undoubtedly heard from many sources: please stay home if you are sick.  Also if you are sick, let me know so that your faith community can provide you with support.  This is a time for solidarity not stigma.

If you are a member of a group that is particularly at risk of serious health complications, please consider your options for spiritual and emotional support carefully.  If you feel comfortable coming to church, please do so, as long as you are not sick.  A second option is that I am more than willing to bring the Holy Sacrament to you in your home.  I am currently healthy and will be monitoring my health carefully.  With God’s sustaining help, I will be available for eucharistic visitation, pastoral visits, and prayer.

Another option is to participate in our worship services digitally.  We are working to make digital options available by this weekend for those who are sick or who want to stay at home.  Digital interaction is not the same thing and face-to-face interaction and participation, and it is not sufficient or sustainable in the long-term.  But as a short-term stopgap it may be the best option for some to connect.  Be on the lookout for links to livestreams of services and other activities. 

Unless the bishop tells me otherwise, I will not be cancelling Sunday Eucharist or weekday Morning Prayer.  During this difficult time we need more prayer and more sacraments, not less.  As one of my friends put it, the prayers of the faithful are the most powerful tool we have in times of crisis.  I stand firm in my conviction that the sacrament of the Eucharist is given by God for the healing of the whole world.  It is more important than ever to continue to offer our sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving to God and pray for grace and healing on behalf of a broken and anguished world. 

In consultation with the vestry, I will be making decisions about whether to cancel other church activities on a case-to-case basis, including Lenten group activities, Bible Study, and various committee meetings.  I spoke with the Rev. Doris Rajagopal today about the Darby Mission Supper next Tuesday night.  She has not cancelled the supper at this time.  Assuming nothing changes in the next several days, I would like for us to go forward with providing the meal.  However, I am strongly discouraging folks who are at high risk of health complications due to coronavirus from attending the meal.   When the time comes we will decide with Doris whether to deliver the food and leave, or to stay with a smaller group of volunteers and help serve.

Most importantly, don’t isolate yourself from this lifegiving body, our church.  Even if you cannot be physically present please reach out.  Call me if you need to talk.  Call each other.  Let’s check in on each and make sure we’re okay.  Above all else, pray for each other and for the safety and well-being of our community. 

Know that God is with us in difficult times.  God has not abandoned the world.  Jesus came into the world as a human to live among us and to demonstrate that God’s love is in solidarity with human suffering.  We are Christ’s body.  We are called to demonstrate to a suffering and fearful world that God is still present with us now. 

Peace & Good,
James+

A Note from the Rector – 3/29/20

12 days.  As of the day I am writing, that’s how many days since I last received the life-giving food of Christ’s body and blood.  It’s been a decade since I’ve gone that long without receiving the Eucharist.  I’ve seen and heard many people talk about how this is a time to realize what we have taken for granted in our lives.   For me, the Eucharist is on the top of the list.  I am sure I am not alone.  The Eucharist has come up a lot, as I’ve spoken to people from our parish in the past two of weeks.  More than one person has wondered if we could do a digital Eucharist, where each person gathers their own elements of bread and wine and I bless them remotely over the internet live-stream.  I have been moved by these conversations and the desire to participate in the great Sacrament of the Church that they express.  I love and admire you all for the strength of your faith and your hunger for the healing food of the Eucharist.  

The thing about the Eucharist is that it is inescapably physical.  The Eucharist embodies the incarnate, the en-fleshed, body of Jesus Christ.  Jesus is made present in the elements of wine and bread for the physically gathered community of the body of Jesus Christ, otherwise known as the Church…otherwise known as you.  This is a material, personal, face-to-face act of thanksgiving and sacrifice.  While the internet can do many things for us, especially in this time of crisis, it cannot simulate the immediacy and intimacy of the Eucharist.  The essential physical nature of the Eucharist is expressed in the Book of Common Prayer in the only instruction during the Eucharistic prayer for what the Celebrant (the priest) must do with their hands.  When saying the Words of Institution–“This is my body…” and “This is the blood…” the priest must touch the bread and touch the chalice.   It’s not that I have magic hands or that there’s anything special about me personally.  It is that the priest (who is standing in for the bishop, actually) represents the entire gathered assembly, offering up everything we have as a sacrifice of praise to God and receiving everything back, blessed, broken open, and dripping with God’s grace.  Good WiFi is no substitute for the real thing.  

As a priest I could celebrate the Eucharist with only another member of my family present.  But to do this for my consolation only, would be (to my conscience) a selfish act.  The intention of the heart is key here.  I do not question the motivation of priests who are celebrating the Eucharist in the absence of a congregation.  I am personally grateful that many of my colleagues have continued to pray the best prayer of the Church (the Eucharist) and to offer up the body and blood of Christ for the healing of our lost and broken world.  But for us, the vestry and I decided that we would livestream Morning Prayer instead of Eucharist as our main service for the time being.

So, we’re in a pickle.  In direct consultation with the Commonwealth’s health department, the bishop has suspended in-person worship services through the first Sunday of May.  I cannot even express how sad I am about the implications.   We cannot gather in person for Palm Sunday, or any of the services of Holy Week, or on the most important and glorious and meaningful day of the entire year—Easter Day.  Nevertheless, the bishop’s decision is the right one.  We need to stay home to save lives and to reduce the pressure on our healthcare system.  This is what loving our neighbor requires of us, and to violate that love—even for the sake of something so intrinsically good as gathering together to worship—is wrong.  

As unprecedented as all this sounds, we are not alone in this.  Our ancestors in faith dealt with similar and even more difficult circumstances.  As the fly said when he fell into the preserves…I’ve been in much worse jams than this.  The Church has lived and faithfully thrived through much worse jams than this.  It is also helpful to remember that not too long ago the norm in the Episcopal church was Morning Prayer three Sundays a month and Eucharist one Sunday a month.  In the Middle Ages, despite daily Eucharists celebrated in most churches, the average faithful Christian would only receive the Eucharist once or twice a year—perhaps only on Easter and Christmas.

The Book of Common Prayer also offers a way forward for us who so desperately want and need the Eucharist:

“If a person desires to receive the Sacrament, but, by reason of extreme sickness or physical disability, is unable to eat and drink the Bread and Wine, the Celebrant is to assure that person that all the benefits of Communion are received, even though the Sacrament is not received with the mouth.”

BCP, page 457

This concept is known as Spiritual Communion.  Even though we cannot receive with our mouths, God’s grace is imparted and made present to us through the holy desire and intentions of our hearts.   We are embodied people and Spiritual Communion is no permanent substitute for the material Eucharist, but in this time, it will carry us through.  So going forward into Holy Week we will create opportunities to make Spiritual Communion and to sharpen the desires and intentions of our hearts toward union with God and each other.  And when this thing is over, and we can gather again, we are going to have one heck of a party and one heavenly Eucharistic feast together.  

Right now, do not doubt that God’s loving presence is everywhere.  God is with you right now.  God hears our cries and sees our desperate moments.  Lord, hear our prayer and let our cry come to you.  Lord make speed to save us.  God make haste to help us.  Amen.   

A Note from the Rector – 3/22/20

None of us intended to give up other people for Lent, but here we are.  It has been an interesting and difficult week. Between the total upheaval of our daily routines and the general chaos of the world, it has been incredibly overwhelming, to say the least.   But there are so many hidden blessings everywhere. One enormous hidden blessing that I would have never expected has been praying the service of Compline every night with about twenty of you.  We’re praying and checking in with each other using a great online application called Zoom. The great thing about Zoom is that you can simply follow a link (you’ll find the info here).  You don’t have to download and install anything. Or, if you don’t have the internet or you don’t have a computer or phone that will work with the video option, you can simply call into the meeting with a toll-free number.  I want to encourage every member of the parish to try to connect to Zoom Compline, at least once in a while. It is a great way to let everyone know how you are doing, to ask for anything you might need, and just to see some friendly faces and hear some friendly voices.  If you need help figuring Zoom out, please call me, and I will work to get you set up!

This feels like a time of exile, even of wilderness.  While it is true that the Body of Christ is and must stay connected to each other, our tradition also has a lot of resources about the spirituality of solitude (which is not the same as isolation), and the spirituality of journeying through desert places, and finding their hidden strength and sustenance.  Think about the Children of Israel who were in the desert for 40 years, learning to trust God above all else before entering the Promised Land. Think of the early monastics we call the Desert Fathers and Mothers. These were folks who left their entire lives and moved out to the deserts of Egypt and Palestine to be alone and to pray.  Some of them eventually formed communities but many lived the lives of hermits, spending most of their time alone in deep and intentional prayer. This is a golden opportunity to explore intentional ways of praying—like Compline, like Morning Prayer, like the Jesus prayer, and the Rosary.    

So, my encouragement here is a bit paradoxical.  On the one hand, we need to stay connected and be a lifeline for each other.  We need to call each other and pray with and for each other virtually. I will continue to call and be available for calls and continue to utilize other technologies to keep us from being isolated from each other.  This is really important. Thank God for the technology to live-stream services and hold online and phone gatherings. On the other hand, this may be time to explore the spiritual discipline of solitude. This may be a time to simplify our lives and discover what matters most.  This time has the potential to reveal a lot about ourselves to ourselves. God is speaking to us even in the midst of chaos, fear, and confusion. The spiritual practice of solitude is about taking time to be quiet and listen to what God is saying. 

I know one thing—in quiet and solitude as in the laughter and warmth of community, God is present with us wherever we are.  God has not abandoned us to our own devices, and nothing can separate us from God’s love for us.  

May God richly bless you in this time.  May God’s protection be on you and those you love.  And may God’s infinite love and mercy be revealed to you in the smallest strangest ways in this coming week.  

PS – Don’t forget to pray the Parish Intercessions. If you need a copy you can find it here.
My cute puppy ate my print copy.

This Week at Holy Apostles – 3/8/2020

Sunday, March 8
The Second Sunday in Lent
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist
5:45 Light & Peace


Monday, March 9

Parish Offices closed

Tuesday, March 10

9:15a Morning Prayer
3:30-6:00p Choir School
5:30p Rosary Group

Wednesday, March 11

9:15a Morning Prayer
6:30p Soup Group

Thursday, March 12

9:15a Morning Prayer
11:00a Bible Study
3:30-6:00p Choir School

Friday, March 13

9:15a Morning Prayer

Sunday, March 15
The Third Sunday in Lent
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist

Announcements – 3/8/2020

Worship

† Healing prayer will take place today, March 8 instead of the usual First Sunday of the Month.

† Are you friendly?  We need you! Our greeter ministry is one of the key ministries of our church.  Greeters welcome visitors, make people comfortable, hand out service leaflets and take up offering.  They make sure the service runs smoothly. Starting in October, we will be organizing a monthly Greeters breakfast with the Rector, probably at a local restaurant.  If you’re interested in serving God in this way, talk to Jim Jervis or Fr. James.

† Morning Prayer is offered at 8:30AM on Sunday mornings and at 9:15AM Tuesdays through Fridays.  Anyone can pray the service privately using the Book of Common Prayer or one of a number of smartphone apps!  See the last section of the digital edition of the “Acts of the Apostles” for details.

Outreach

† Our next Darby Mission meal in on Tuesday March 17th. We need volunteers to cook the main dish, provide salad, sides and desserts, and help serve and clean up. There is a sign-up sheet in the parish hall and online below. We will be cooking American Chop Suey and frozen beef has been provided by the Hughes and is in the downstairs freezer. We will meet at church on the 17th at 5pm or at Darby Borough Recreation Center, 1022 Ridge Avenue Darby at 5:30.

† Sign-up sheet:  bit.ly/2v11lAj

† The recipe is American Chop Suey and the Hughes have provided ground beef that is in the basement freezer. Please make a double portion to serve 16 people. Link: bit.ly/2TJ1ksZ

† There are lots of opportunities to participate in Holy Apostles Outreach through our various programs:

      – Delivering items to a food pantry in Northeast Philadelphia

Children and Youth

† Nursery childcare is available during the 10:00AM Sunday service for children ages 3 and younger in the Godly Play Room.

† The Holy Apostles Choir School is off and running.  If you have a potential student, apply today.  More information is available at holyapostlespa.org/choir-school/. Please forward this information to friends and neighbors who may be interested. Contact Deb Stambaugh if you have any questions.

Parish Life

† The Vestry has duly elected John Day to serve as the Senior Warden until January 2021

† New Vestry Members: At our annual meeting on February 2, Drew Meiers, Susanne Wherry and Joe Zorc finished their time on the vestry, and we elected three new members. The current vestry is:

Through 2022 (New Members)

Toni Meiers; Cassie Woestman;  Judi Kraft

Through 2020

John Day; Suzanne Lees; Tom Forker

Through 2021

Meg Delevan; Mike Johnson; Peter Patton

† If you have an announcement to be included in Acts of the Apostles, please send it to holyapostlescomm@gmail.com before Thursday at noon of each week.

† Don’t forget to enter the church through the Parish office door and grab a “Church Member” badge from the office during Daycare hours (7:00AM – 6:00PM Mon-Fri)!

† The Cash for Causes Program at Giant Supermarket:

· Purchase through JT Wertz

· 5% of card value is given to Holy Apostles operating fund.

· Can be used in store or when ordering Giant groceries through Peapod online delivery service.

Education

† Death is inevitable.  As Christians we’re called to prepare for death in the hope of the Resurrection.  Our Lenten Soup Group this year will focus on the theology and practice of a good death.  The five weeks series will be held on Wednesdays during Lent starting on March 4. Topics will include a theology of death and dying, devotions and practices surrounding death and dying, funeral planning, end of life bio-ethics, and creating wills and advanced directives.  You’ll be amazed how fun talking about death can be! Everyone is welcome. If you would like childcare, let Fr. James know as soon as possible.

† Join us for BASICS class, every 3rd Sunday at 9AM.

† Bible Study on Deuteronomy, Thursdays at 11AM.  All are welcome.

† Rosary Group—Tuesday at 5:30pm

A Note from the Rector – 3/8/2020

God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power, and love, and a sound mind (2 Timothy 1:7).  I am using this week’s Note to address our parish’s response to COVID-19.  As followers of Jesus, we are called away from fear and toward trusting in the healing mercy of Jesus Christ and the invincible power of God’s love.  God promises not to abandon us in suffering, illness, or even death (Romans 8:38-39). In this season of Lent, we are preparing our hearts and minds to encounter the mystery of the Empty Tomb and to experience the Resurrected Christ in our own lives. As a people who serve the one who has conquered death, hell, and the grave, we reject the kind of fear that seeks to control our lives.  Instead, we continue always, no matter what, to celebrate the life God has given us and the promises we have received through Jesus. As an expression of our faith in the faithfulness of God, the Church continues to gather and worship the One from Whom we came and to Whom we shall return. 

The faith we have in the power and love of God, however, does not conflict with prudence and common sense, what Timothy might have called a sound mind.  In light of that our bishop, Daniel Gutierrez, has provided some guidelines and suggestions for some common sense moves we can make as a parish to protect each other from communicable diseases including COVID-19.  I do not want us to institute these measures out of fear, but I do think they are reasonable steps to take out of genuine love and care for each other, and especially those who are vulnerable to illness in our parish and community.

Door Handles

Efforts will be made to wipe down all door handles before and after church with disinfectant.  

The Peace

I am asking that we do not hug or kiss each other on the cheek during the peace.  You may consider an alternative form of passing the peace apart from hand-shaking as well, such as elbow tapping.  Some may prefer to not come into contact with another at all, and instead give the “peace” sign with their fingers.  Let’s respect each other’s comfort levels.

Handwashing

Immediately after the peace and announcements you will see me head to the sacristy where I will wash my hands with soap and water for 20 seconds (while saying the Lord’s Prayer, which takes roughly 20 seconds to say, hint, hint) in order to make sure my hands are clean to handle the elements of Communion.  I am asking that our chalice bearers please follow me in this practice.

Offering

At the bishop’s suggestion, I am asking greeters not pass the offering plates from hand to hand, but attempt to collect the offering while holding the plates themselves.  We’ll play this by ear and see if we can come up with a system that works.  

Common Cup

The bishop has asked for a temporary end of the practice of intinction—that is, taking the bread in your fingers and dipping it in the cup.  The reason for this is that a person’s fingers or knuckles often come into contact with the cup or the wine during intinction (I can certainly attest the accuracy of that observation).

We believe that Christ is truly present in the bread and the wine, and Christ is sufficiently present each.  Therefore, it is perfectly acceptable to receive in only one kind—the bread—if you would rather not drink from the common cup.  You won’t be getting less Jesus. Jesus is present through and through. Our Prayer Book, however, mandates that both bread and wine must be consecrated and made available to any baptized Christian who wishes to receive them.  So, we will continue to offer both bread and wine. At the bishop’s behest, I strongly discourage you from intincting, and please don’t drink from the common cup if you are uncomfortable doing so.

Coffee Hour

Let’s please use additional caution in food handling during coffee hour.  

God is with us during this time.  Let us come together without fear, with love and care for each other.  Let us recommit ourselves to earnest prayer for those who are ill and those who are afraid and lonely.  There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out all fear (1 John 4:18).

In Christ,

+ James

This Week at Holy Apostles – 3/1/2020

Sunday, March 1
The First Sunday in Lent
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist


Monday, March 2

Parish Offices closed

Tuesday, March 3

9:15a Morning Prayer
3:30-6:00p Choir School
5:30p Rosary Group

Wednesday, March 4

9:15a Morning Prayer
6:30p Soup Group

Thursday, March 5

11:00a Bible Study
3:30-6:00p Choir School

Friday, March 6

9:15a Morning Prayer

Sunday, March 8
The Second Sunday in Lent
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist
5p Youth Group
5:45p Light & Peace

Announcements – 3/1/2020

Worship

† Healing prayer will take place March 8 instead of the usual First Sunday of the Month.

† No Morning Prayer on March 5

† Are you friendly?  We need you! Our greeter ministry is one of the key ministries of our church.  Greeters welcome visitors, make people comfortable, hand out service leaflets and take up offering.  They make sure the service runs smoothly. Starting in October, we will be organizing a monthly Greeters breakfast with the Rector, probably at a local restaurant.  If you’re interested in serving God in this way, talk to Jim Jervis or Fr. James.

† Morning Prayer is offered at 8:30AM on Sunday mornings and at 9:15AM Tuesdays through Fridays.  Anyone can pray the service privately using the Book of Common Prayer or one of a number of smartphone apps!  See the last section of the digital edition of the “Acts of the Apostles” for details.

Outreach

† There are lots of opportunities to participate in Holy Apostles Outreach through our various programs:

      – Delivering items to a food pantry in Northeast Philadelphia

      – Meals at Darby Mission (3/17). Other ideas are welcome.

Children and Youth

† Nursery childcare is available during the 10:00AM Sunday service for children ages 3 and younger in the Godly Play Room.

† The Holy Apostles Choir School is off and running.  If you have a potential student, apply today.  More information is available at holyapostlespa.org/choir-school/. Please forward this information to friends and neighbors who may be interested. Contact Deb Stambaugh if you have any questions.

Parish Life

† The Vestry has duly elected John Day to serve as the Senior Warden until January 2021

† Today, Sunday, March 1st after the 10 am service, we will be hosting an informational meeting of The Order of the Daughters of the King (DOK).  Jane McKinney, President of the Diocesan Assembly of Pennsylvania will visit Holy Apostles to meet with all women who would like to learn more about this very special Order of Episcopal Women.  The Order of the Daughters of the King is a 135-year old organization established by Women of the Episcopal Church dedicated to Prayer, Service and Evangelism by helping others experience God’s love through the fellowship of the church.  Their work is dedicated to serving the parish and parish family, and our communities as well as providing new connections for women of Holy Apostles. All women are welcome and encouraged to attend the meeting to learn more about Daughters of the King.  If you have any questions, please reach out to Linda Day, lindambday@gmail.com 610-290-2860.  Linda is a member of Daughters of the King, and previously an active member of the chapter at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in San Juan Capistrano, CA

† Apostles Gallery, our new parish artistic endeavor (and hallway wall beautification project), will offer a new exhibition of work for Lent entitled “Jerusalem: Meditations on the Holy City.”  This show will feature woodcuts by Margaret Adams Parker inspired by her pilgrimages to the Holy City, as well as photographs from last year’s diocesan pilgrimage, and more. Artwork will be for sale and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Princess Basma Center, a Jerusalem based children’s hospital and school operated by the Episicopal Diocese of Jerusalem.  There will be a fun opening reception on March 7th at 6:30PM.

† New Vestry Members: At our annual meeting on February 2, Drew Meiers, Susanne Wherry and Joe Zorc finished their time on the vestry, and we elected three new members. The current vestry is:

Through 2022 (New Members)

Toni Meiers; Cassie Woestman;  Judi Kraft

Through 2020

John Day; Suzanne Lees; Tom Forker

Through 2021

Meg Delevan; Mike Johnson; Peter Patton

† If you have an announcement to be included in Acts of the Apostles, please send it to holyapostlescomm@gmail.com before Thursday at noon of each week.

† Don’t forget to enter the church through the Parish office door and grab a “Church Member” badge from the office during Daycare hours (7:00AM – 6:00PM Mon-Fri)!

† The Cash for Causes Program at Giant Supermarket:

· Purchase through JT Wertz

· 5% of card value is given to Holy Apostles operating fund.

· Can be used in store or when ordering Giant groceries through Peapod online delivery service.

Education

† Death is inevitable.  As Christians we’re called to prepare for death in the hope of the Resurrection.  Our Lenten Soup Group this year will focus on the theology and practice of a good death.  The five weeks series will be held on Wednesdays during Lent starting on March 4. Topics will include a theology of death and dying, devotions and practices surrounding death and dying, funeral planning, end of life bio-ethics, and creating wills and advanced directives.  You’ll be amazed how fun talking about death can be! Everyone is welcome. If you would like childcare, let Fr. James know as soon as possible.

† Join us for BASICS class, every 3rd Sunday at 9AM.

† Bible Study on Deuteronomy, Thursdays at 11AM.  All are welcome.

† FacePsalm online study of the Psalms: bit.ly/2ndKq9o

This Week at Holy Apostles – 2/23/2020

Sunday, February 23
The Last Sunday after Epiphany
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist


Monday, February 24

Parish Offices closed

Tuesday, February 25

9:15a Morning Prayer
3:30-6:00p Choir School
6:30p Pancake Dinner

Wednesday, February 26

7:00-8:30a Ashes to Go
9:15a Imposition of Ashes
12:15p Eucharist and Imposition of Ashes
6:30p Eucharist and Imposition of Ashes with music

Thursday, February 27

9:15a Morning Prayer
11:00a Bible Study
3:30-6:00p Choir School

Friday, February 28

9:15a Morning Prayer

Sunday, March 1
The First Sunday in Lent
Celebrant and Preacher: The Rev. James Stambaugh

8:30a Morning Prayer
10:00a Holy Eucharist

Announcements – 2/23/2020

Worship

† Lent is coming!  Ash Wednesday is February 26.  We will have three services with opportunities for the imposition of ashes, as well as, a potential “ashes to go” location at Pennfield station.  Services are as follows:

† 9:15am: Imposition of Ashes (no Eucharist)

† 12:15pm: Eucharist and the Imposition of Ashes

† 6:30pm: Eucharist and the Imposition of Ashes with music

† Are you friendly?  We need you! Our greeter ministry is one of the key ministries of our church.  Greeters welcome visitors, make people comfortable, hand out service leaflets and take up offering.  They make sure the service runs smoothly. Starting in October, we will be organizing a monthly Greeters breakfast with the Rector, probably at a local restaurant.  If you’re interested in serving God in this way, talk to Jim Jervis or Fr. James.

† Morning Prayer is offered at 8:30AM on Sunday mornings and at 9:15AM Tuesdays through Fridays.  Anyone can pray the service privately using the Book of Common Prayer or one of a number of smartphone apps!  See the last section of the digital edition of the “Acts of the Apostles” for details.

Outreach

† There are lots of opportunities to participate in Holy Apostles Outreach through our various programs:

      – Delivering items to a food pantry in Northeast Philadelphia

      – Meals at Darby Mission (3/17). Other ideas are welcome.

Children and Youth

† Nursery childcare is available during the 10:00AM Sunday service for children ages 3 and younger in the Godly Play Room.

† The Holy Apostles Choir School is off and running.  If you have a potential student, apply today.  More information is available at holyapostlespa.org/choir-school/. Please forward this information to friends and neighbors who may be interested. Contact Deb Stambaugh if you have any questions.

Parish Life

† On Sunday, March 1st after the 10 am service, we will be hosting an informational meeting of The Order of the Daughters of the King (DOK).  Jane McKinney, President of the Diocesan Assembly of Pennsylvania will visit Holy Apostles to meet with all women who would like to learn more about this very special Order of Episcopal Women.  The Order of the Daughters of the King is a 135-year old organization established by Women of the Episcopal Church dedicated to Prayer, Service and Evangelism by helping others experience God’s love through the fellowship of the church.  Their work is dedicated to serving the parish and parish family, and our communities as well as providing new connections for women of Holy Apostles. All women are welcome and encouraged to attend the meeting to learn more about Daughters of the King.  If you have any questions, please reach out to Linda Day, lindambday@gmail.com 610-290-2860.  Linda is a member of Daughters of the King, and previously an active member of the chapter at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in San Juan Capistrano, CA

† The Strove Tuesday Pancake Supper is on February 25 at 6:30PM. In addition to pancakes, we’ll have games and activities for kids and a fresh batch of homebrewed beer by our own master brewer Todd Delevan! We need volunteers for setting up, cooking and taking down. Contact Drew Meiers (dkmeiers@verizon.net) to volunteer. Todd Delevan is providing excellent homebrewed beer. There will be plenty, so if you would like to take some home, bring your own growler or borrow one of his — he’ll need the glass back when you’re done.

† Apostles Gallery, our new parish artistic endeavor (and hallway wall beautification project), will offer a new exhibition of work for Lent entitled “Jerusalem: Meditations on the Holy City.”  This show will feature woodcuts by Margaret Adams Parker inspired by her pilgrimages to the Holy City, as well as photographs from last year’s diocesan pilgrimage, and more. Artwork will be for sale and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Princess Basma Center, a Jerusalem based children’s hospital and school operated by the Episicopal Diocese of Jerusalem.  There will be a fun opening reception on March 7th at 6:30PM.

† New Vestry Members: At our annual meeting on February 2, Drew Meiers, Susanne Wherry and Joe Zorc finished their time on the vestry, and we elected three new members. The current vestry is:

†  Through 2022 (New Members)

Toni Meiers; Cassie Woestman;  Judi Kraft

†  Through 2020

John Day; Suzanne Lees; Tom Forker

†  Through 2021

Meg Delevan; Mike Johnson; Peter Patton

† The vestry is meeting tomorrow, February 24 at 7pm.

† If you have an announcement to be included in Acts of the Apostles, please send it to holyapostlescomm@gmail.com before Thursday at noon of each week.

† Don’t forget to enter the church through the Parish office door and grab a “Church Member” badge from the office during Daycare hours (7:00AM – 6:00PM Mon-Fri)!

† The Cash for Causes Program at Giant Supermarket:

· Purchase through JT Wertz

· 5% of card value is given to Holy Apostles operating fund.

· Can be used in store or when ordering Giant groceries through Peapod online delivery service.

Education

† Death is inevitable.  As Christians we’re called to prepare for death in the hope of the Resurrection.  Our Lenten Soup Group this year will focus on the theology and practice of a good death.  The five weeks series will be held on Wednesdays during Lent starting on March 4. Topics will include a theology of death and dying, devotions and practices surrounding death and dying, funeral planning, end of life bio-ethics, and creating wills and advanced directives.  You’ll be amazed how fun talking about death can be! Everyone is welcome. If you would like childcare, let Fr. James know as soon as possible.

† Join us for BASICS class, every 3rd Sunday at 9AM.

· Third Sunday Basics Class will continue February 16 with a class called “What is liturgy?”

† Bible Study on Deuteronomy, Thursdays at 11AM.  All are welcome.

† FacePsalm online study of the Psalms: bit.ly/2ndKq9o