Announcements

Coronavirus Update from the Rector

Dear Holy Apostles,

Grace and peace to you from God.  The consensus of the CDC and other health officials is that, along with washing your hands, social distancing is a vitally important part of mitigating the spread and severity of coronavirus (COVID-19) in our community.  Social distancing means keeping away from large gatherings and creating a wider “personal bubble” when you are out in public.  And most importantly, it means staying home and away from others when you are sick.  These steps are essential parts of taking care of ourselves as well as loving our neighbors as ourselves. 

However, the danger is that in the process of social distancing we will end up emotionally and spiritually isolating ourselves.  In other words, I worry our reactions to the COVID-19 health crisis—especially reactions that are driven by fear—will only add to one of the pandemics that has gripped our society for some time, the virulent and insidious pandemic of loneliness, isolation, and despair. 

Emotional and spiritual distancing isn’t going to help anyone.  There is, in fact, a direct link between spiritual health and physical and emotional health.  This essential connection has not diminished because there is a new and scary public health emergency.  We need to maintain our spiritual connection to God and each other.  The question is:  how do we as a church take prudent precautions against the spread of infectious disease while maintaining a sense of community and spiritual care which imbues life with meaning and makes it worth living in the first place?  This is a difficult but not impossible balance.  I wrote last week about the precautions we are taking at church including wiping down high-touch surfaces before and after services, exploring alternatives to handshakes and hugs during the Peace, and increasing the amount of hand washing that goes on before Holy Communion.  I also wrote about the sufficiency of only taking Communion in one kind, the bread.

At this time I want to reiterate what you have undoubtedly heard from many sources: please stay home if you are sick.  Also if you are sick, let me know so that your faith community can provide you with support.  This is a time for solidarity not stigma.

If you are a member of a group that is particularly at risk of serious health complications, please consider your options for spiritual and emotional support carefully.  If you feel comfortable coming to church, please do so, as long as you are not sick.  A second option is that I am more than willing to bring the Holy Sacrament to you in your home.  I am currently healthy and will be monitoring my health carefully.  With God’s sustaining help, I will be available for eucharistic visitation, pastoral visits, and prayer.

Another option is to participate in our worship services digitally.  We are working to make digital options available by this weekend for those who are sick or who want to stay at home.  Digital interaction is not the same thing and face-to-face interaction and participation, and it is not sufficient or sustainable in the long-term.  But as a short-term stopgap it may be the best option for some to connect.  Be on the lookout for links to livestreams of services and other activities. 

Unless the bishop tells me otherwise, I will not be cancelling Sunday Eucharist or weekday Morning Prayer.  During this difficult time we need more prayer and more sacraments, not less.  As one of my friends put it, the prayers of the faithful are the most powerful tool we have in times of crisis.  I stand firm in my conviction that the sacrament of the Eucharist is given by God for the healing of the whole world.  It is more important than ever to continue to offer our sacrifice of praise and thanksgiving to God and pray for grace and healing on behalf of a broken and anguished world. 

In consultation with the vestry, I will be making decisions about whether to cancel other church activities on a case-to-case basis, including Lenten group activities, Bible Study, and various committee meetings.  I spoke with the Rev. Doris Rajagopal today about the Darby Mission Supper next Tuesday night.  She has not cancelled the supper at this time.  Assuming nothing changes in the next several days, I would like for us to go forward with providing the meal.  However, I am strongly discouraging folks who are at high risk of health complications due to coronavirus from attending the meal.   When the time comes we will decide with Doris whether to deliver the food and leave, or to stay with a smaller group of volunteers and help serve.

Most importantly, don’t isolate yourself from this lifegiving body, our church.  Even if you cannot be physically present please reach out.  Call me if you need to talk.  Call each other.  Let’s check in on each and make sure we’re okay.  Above all else, pray for each other and for the safety and well-being of our community. 

Know that God is with us in difficult times.  God has not abandoned the world.  Jesus came into the world as a human to live among us and to demonstrate that God’s love is in solidarity with human suffering.  We are Christ’s body.  We are called to demonstrate to a suffering and fearful world that God is still present with us now. 

Peace & Good,
James+

A Note from the Rector – 04/18/2021

This Wednesday, April 21st at 6:30 we will have an opportunity to discuss gun violence in our community and what God might be calling our parish to do about it. The plans for this discussion arose from our nightly Compline group. I want to describe to you how this came about because it says something very important and gives us a way forward. 

On March 11th, there was a quadruple shooting on N. 76th street in Overbrook Park. That’s about a mile and half from the church. That night at Compline the shooting came up. During the prayer time, someone offered a prayer for the victims of the shooting and all who were affected by it. When that prayer was prayed, several of us on the call felt a little tug in our hearts. It was as if someone or something was saying, “this is important, don’t forget this.” It was as if God was speaking to us. I believe that God was answering the prayer as we prayed it. We ourselves are affected by this shooting and God was speaking to us in answer to our own prayer. 

After prayer, we discovered that God had been speaking to several of us and a conversation ensued. We also discovered over the course of several night’s discussion (not that we didn’t already know) that the topic of gun violence is a contentious and polarizing topic, which is very difficult to talk about even in the abstract. That is when we decided to dedicate a separate time to the conversation in order to preserve the function of Compline as a prayerful moment and an opportunity to check in with each other.

The fact is, gun violence is not abstract. It isn’t a distant problem affecting distant people. It is ubiquitous and very close to home and it is affecting our neighbors and us. So, the question for me is: who am I, if I am the person who walks right past a neighbor who is suffering, without even so much as pausing because of my own fear? The answer to that question is found in Jesus’ parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37). In the story, a person has been robbed and is dying in a ditch on the side of the road. A religious leader comes by but does not stop to help because he is afraid of the ramifications of getting entangled in someone else’s problem. So, the religious leader, crosses to the other side of the street and goes on his way. So, yes, I am that person, if I allow a mere street, an invisible but powerful border named City Avenue, to prevent me from noticing the pain and suffering of my neighbor. I am on a dangerous spiritual trajectory whenever I choose to stay on my side of the street, rather than get entangled in a problem that, in reality, is everyone’s problem. 
 
No doubt about it, this is a very tricky topic for a bunch of reasons. Gun violence on a macro level is a huge societal problem that we can’t make a dent in. In addition—and here’s the real fear that drives a lot of apathy—it is very hard to know what to do and how to act in the midst of very uncomfortable and complex dynamics of race, geography, and socio-economics. Some of us are afraid that if we step into this fraught territory, we may not find a way through, or we’ll be too miserable to carry on. Some of us are rightly concerned that if we rush over to Overbrook Park and start “fixing” stuff that we will fall into in what is known as “white savior complex.” That danger is very real. Even with the best intentions, we can do much harm if we do not pay attention to power dynamics. But the other danger, the death-dealing danger of apathy, is an even greater concern. There are risks in having this conversation, but taking risks is part and parcel with taking up our cross and following Jesus.

Ours is a politically diverse congregation, a fact about which I am very pleased.  When we have the conversation on Wednesday, it is going to be tricky not to run aground on partisan political differences, and thus never get to the heart of the topic: What is God calling us to do, here, now? 
 
So, I am proposing some ground rules for our conversation:

  • Keep the conversation away from partisan politics. In the spirit of Christian unity, let’s try to avoid partisan labels for people and ideas.  As part of this effort, let’s not discuss or debate the effectiveness of particular legislative solutions. Obviously legislation matters, but there are plenty of opportunities outside our time on Wednesday to talk about legislation and to contact your congress-people and senators regarding it.  We’re trying to have a different conversation.
  • Keep the conversation away from the Second Amendment. Again, there are plenty of forums to discuss and debate constitutional law.  But, in many ways, this is a more modest proposal. 
  • Keep the conversation local and concrete. It is all too tempting to generalize and to retreat to hypothetical situations in an attempt to avert our eyes from the facts that are right in front of us. Let’s try to keep this conversation about the actual experience of our neighbors and community; not on what might happen, but what is happening.
  • Let’s avoid Pelagianism and have some humility. Even as we avoid apathy, we must also avoid the temptation to think of ourselves as saviors of the world. We’re not Jesus. Pelagianism is an ancient heresy that believes we have the power within ourselves to save ourselves and solve all our problems. Part of our society’s problem is that it is delusional about the extent to which we can solve our own problems without relying on each other and on God. Even at the very local level, this is a complex problem with many components, including spiritual ones. We lack the power to solve the problem of gun violence, and we’re certainly not going to fix it by just talking about it. Instead, what our time Wednesday is about is listening to and paying attention to what God is already doing in this neighborhood, and how God might be calling us to get on board. 

God is up to something, and I think our conversation on Wednesday is going to be excellent. I hope all of you join us. We’ll use the Zoom Compline Link.

A Note from the Rector – 03/28/2021

Spring is here! Easter is only a week away. The daffodils are getting ready to bloom outside the church, and I’m pretty sure the tulips are coming up as well. For me, these are simple and joyful reminders of the Resurrection of Jesus. 

I sent a letter to everyone in the parish directory with details about all the Holy Week services. If for some reason you didn’t get it, let me know! 

I promised to highlight a couple of ways that folks can participate in Holy Week services from home, but I was beat to the punch. Thanks to Toni Meiers and Katie Gentile, our weekly email impresaria, you will find several wonderful ideas highlighted in the Acts of the Apostles. Remember that however we worship, from home or in the church building, we are being gathered together by God’s grace. Through our one baptism, we are one body—Christ’s—with one Lord, Jesus.      

I hope you enjoy the warmer weather this week. I look forward to worshiping with you, either in person or online, during this holiest time of the year. Don’t hesitate to reach out to me with any questions, thoughts, or concerns! 

Acts of the Apostles – 03/28/2021

Week Of March 28, 2021

This Sunday

SUNDAY OF THE PASSION: PALM SUNDAY

10AM Holy Eucharist
Limited to 40 in-person attendees
Social distancing and masks required – Sign Up
Watch the broadcast on our YouTube channel
Service Material can be found on our website

Scripture readings

The Liturgy of the Palms
Mark 11:1-11

The Liturgy of the Word
Isaiah 50:4-9a
Psalm 31:9-16
Philippians 2:5-11
Mark 14:1-15:47

A Note from the Rector

Spring is here!  Easter is only a week away. The daffodils are getting ready to bloom outside the church, and I’m pretty sure the tulips are coming up as well.  For me, these are simple and joyful reminders of the Resurrection of Jesus. 

I sent a letter to everyone in the parish directory with details about all the Holy Week services. If for some reason you didn’t get it, let me know! 

I promised to highlight a couple of ways that folks can participate in Holy Week services from home, but I was beat to the punch. Thanks to Toni Meiers and Katie Gentile, our weekly email impresaria, you will find several wonderful ideas highlighted below in this email. Remember that however we worship, from home or in the church building, we are being gathered together by God’s grace.  Through our one baptism, we are one body—Christ’s—with one Lord, Jesus.      

I hope you enjoy the warmer weather this week. I look forward to worshiping with you, either in person or online, during this holiest time of the year.  Don’t hesitate to reach out to me with any questions, thoughts, or concerns! 

Services

You can view our live-stream on our YouTube channel.  
A link to this video will be posted to Facebook.
To attend in person, please sign up to reserve your spot.

Sunday, March 28, 2021 – Palm Sunday
Holy Eucharist with Blessing of the Palms, Procession, Passion Reading
and Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM

Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 40
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 – The BCP Daily Office
Every Tuesday in Lent 
 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer, BCP p.75  – YouTube
12:00 PM – Noonday Prayer, BCP p.103- Zoom
 5:30 PM – Evening Prayer, BPC p.115 – YouTube
 7:30 PM – Compline, BCP p.127 – Zoom
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

HOLY WEEK SERVICES

Wednesday, March 31, 2021 – Tenebrae (The Service of Shadows)
Matins & Lauds 6:30PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Thursday, April 1, 2021 – Maundy Thursday
Holy Eucharist with Prayers of Spiritual Communion
and Stripping of the Altar 6:30PM

Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

The Altar of Repose & All-Night Vigil 8:00pm-6:00am Friday
We hope to provide a life-stream of the Altar of Repose as well

Friday, April 2, 2021 – Good Friday
Service of Readings & Meditations 12:00PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Stations of the Cross 2:30PM
Using our Compline Zoom link
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Good Friday Liturgy with Music and Veneration of the Cross 6:30PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Saturday, April 3, 2021 – Holy Saturday
Holy Saturday Liturgy 9:15AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 50
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

The Great Vigil of Easter 8PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 50
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Sunday, April 4, 2021 – Easter Sunday
Festival Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 50
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Weekday Meetings

Zoom Compline is held every night at 7:30PM
A brief time of prayer and checking in with other members of CHA
“Zoom Compline has been really helped me through this difficult time.  It’s such a great way to close the day.” – CHA Member
Follow this link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/233415613?pwd=dTBDeUhrUUdSak9MS3RUaXdDSDhpUT09
or call into the meeting toll-free 1-888-475-4499 
Callers will be promoted to enter this meeting ID: 233 415 613
and passcode: love

Zoom Bible Studyis held every Thursday at 11AM
We have just started a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Please join us as we discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. No previous experience required.
Follow this link to join:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09
or call 1-888-475-4499 US Toll-free
You will be prompted to enter this meeting ID: 788 355 291
and passcode: love

*note: the passcode for all CHA Zoom meetings is “love”

Outreach – Up Next
Lenten Service Project

Objective:
To show continued support for helping with
food scarcity issues in the community

Beloved, let us love one another, because love is from God;
everyone who loves is born of God and knows God.
1 John 4:7 NRSV
~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Darby Mission

This is our last week in the current push to help stock and replenish the Darby mission Food Pantry and School Supplies. Your response to last week’s call for mayo and crayons (an odd combination to be sure!) was wonderful. Thank you!

Below is the “top ten” list of items that are required to meet the needs of Rev. Doris’ clients. Other non-perishable items also accepted.  

School Supplies: crayons, glue sticks, composition books, pencilsFood and Hygiene:: pasta, pasta sauce, tuna, cereal, tampons 

Drop off location: In the room to the left off the church narthex. 

Remember if you dislike shopping or can’t get out and about you can still participate in this and any of our outreach opportunities! Make a monetary donation to the cause with a check to Church of the Holy Apostles in any amount and write OUTREACH in the memo. Or use the GIVE button on our website and choose Darby Mission in the drop down list.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
THANK YOU for your continued support of those
in need in our communities.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Cassie Woestman, Outreach Chairperson, contact info:
Email: grammysqrd@gmail.com
Phone/Text: 610-608-5440

Announcements

+ Blessed Palms – If you would like to have some palms from the Palm Sunday service for your home, they willbe available on a table outside the church from the end of service until 3pm, rain or shine, for contact-less .pickup.

+ Altar of Repose Signups – The altar of repose is an area other than the main altar where the consecrated bread and wine from the Maundy Thursday eucharist are reserved for communion on Good Friday. Please sign up for a one-hour slot between 8pm Maundy Thursday (after the conclusion of the service) and 6am on Good Friday. Up to 2 individuals or family members may sign up for each hour of the watch. 

+ The week of April of 5th-9th James will taking some professional development time, including a brief retreat. He’s still available for pastoral emergencies, but otherwise he won’t be around much.  

+ Save the Date – A Conversation about Gun Violence and our Parish’s response within our Community – Wednesday, April 21. Watch this space for more details.

+ Church Service Attendance – Masks and appropriate distancing will continue to be observed. We look forward to seeing you back at church if you feel comfortable there. Please note that you must pre-register to attend service to allow us to continue keeping with our safe practices. If you are serving (organist, reader, cantor, tech, usher, etc.) please remember to sign up as well. Services will also continue to be livestreamed. 

+ Sunday School: Sunday School will be held online via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month for preschool (5 years old) through 8th grade.  You can join Sunday School using this link (all ages welcome):   https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89142013163?pwd=WFpJVDlZVFJhOUVVa1gxQ2k0djVndz09
We’re looking for more teachers! If you would like to be involved in this exciting ministry, contact Peter Patton: pmpatton307@gmail.com

+ Bible Study: Every Thursday at 11AM (currently on Zoom). We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. . Join us anytime using this link: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09

+ One Love: Our diocese has created an online platform where you can find inspirational videos, sermons by the bishop and other clergy, and online services.  Visit DioPA One Love Online: https://episcopalpa.online.church

+Eucharistic Visits: During this time, the rector and trained Eucharistic ministers may visit others to bring them the Eucharist. Meeting in outdoor spaces of homes will be preferred.  Contact the rector if you would like to schedule a visit. 

+Giving: You can still mail pledge contributions to the church at this time.  The mail is checked regularly.  You can also securely give online.  Go to holyapostlespa.org and click on the “Give” button on the top right hand corner of the webpage.  

+ Online Worship: Online worship continues!  We will be live-streaming each Sunday at 10AM.  We will be calling on our virtual choir to provide music for us, and there will be occasional readings from members at home.  It’s all happening on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button!

+ Happy Birthday! The following folks have birthdays in the month of April.

6th     Robbie Zorc
9th      Emma Gallagher
16th    Lisa Ferreri
17th    Drew Meiers
19th    Pat Dyer
20th    Vickie Forker
26th    Judi Kraft
28th    James Stambaugh
29th      Jim Jervis

If your birthday, or the birthday of another parishioner in your family is missing, please notify the Parish Office at holyapostlespa@gmail.com

Our mailing address is:
1020 Remington Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096 

Acts of the Apostles – 03/14/2021

Week of March 14, 2021

This Sunday

FOURTH SUNDAY IN LENT
10AM Holy Eucharist
Limited to 20 in-person attendees
Social distancing and masks required – Sign Up
Watch the broadcast on our YouTube channel
Service Material can be found on our website  
Scripture readings
Numbers 21:4-9
Psalm 107:1-3, 17-22
Ephesians 2:1-10
John 3:14-21

A Note from the Rector

Last Sunday after church we had a lovely conversation about Esther DeWaal’s book Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict.  Our discussion of Christian monasticism was wide-ranging across the topic of Christian monasticism in general, and I enjoyed it very much.  In the course of the conversation, I tangentially remarked (as I am wont to do) about the importance of the Eastern monastic prayer practice known as the Jesus Prayer.  This prayer developed out of the Desert Monastic tradition that I wrote about last week, and it is another bit of vital monastic wisdom, that is fitting and easily adaptable for our own contemporary non-monastic lives. So, I thought I would write a bit more about the Jesus Prayer and commend it to you for exploration in your own spiritual journey. 

The Jesus Prayer is simple and short: Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.  Sometimes even the “a sinner” part is left off.  The prayer is biblical.  It is based on several passages from the Gospels.  Luke 18:38, for example when a person seeking God’s healing power cries out as Jesus passes by: “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me.”  That story provides the context and the essence of this simple and profound prayer.  The Jesus Prayer is the simple, memorable, and frankly, powerful cry of a soul to its Creator and Savior and Lord.  The cry results in Jesus hearing the supplicant, stopping, having compassion, and healing this person in need. 

The practice of the Jesus Prayer answers the impulse to follow St. Paul’s admonition in 1 Thessalonians 5:17 to “pray without ceasing.”  [more]

Services

You can view our live-stream on our YouTube channel.  
A link to this video will be posted to Facebook.
To attend in person, please sign up to reserve your spot.

Sunday, March 14, 2021 – 4th Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Tuesday, March 16, 2021 – The BCP Daily Office
Every Tuesday in Lent 
 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer, BCP p.75  – YouTube
12:00 PM – Noonday Prayer, BCP p.103- Zoom
 5:30 PM – Evening Prayer, BPC p.115 – YouTube
 7:30 PM – Compline, BCP p.127 – Zoom
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Sunday, March 21, 2021 – 5th Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Zoom Compline is held every night at 7:30PM
A brief time of prayer and checking in with other members of CHA
“Zoom Compline has been really helped me through this difficult time.  It’s such a great way to close the day.” – CHA Member
Follow this link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/233415613?pwd=dTBDeUhrUUdSak9MS3RUaXdDSDhpUT09
or call into the meeting toll-free 1-888-475-4499 
Callers will be promoted to enter this meeting ID: 233 415 613
and passcode: love

Zoom Bible Study is held every Thursday at 11AM
We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. 
Follow this link to join:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09
or call 1-888-475-4499 US Toll-free
You will be prompted to enter this meeting ID: 788 355 291
and passcode: love

*note: the passcode for all CHA Zoom meetings is “love”

Outreach – Up Next
Lenten Service Project

Objective:
To show continued support for helping with food scarcity issues in the community

A portion of your generosity, loaded up and ready to deliver
to the Darby Mission.

UPDATE: We could especially use mayonnaise and crayons.
Collection of all items continues through Easter Sunday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have,
for such sacrifices are pleasing to God.
Hebrews 13:16 NRSV

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Darby Mission

During Lent our goal is to help stock and replenish the Darby mission Food Pantry and School Supplies. Below is a “top ten” list of items that would be required to meet the needs of Rev. Doris’ clients. Other non-perishable items also accepted. Children and Youth could be encouraged to concentrate on school supplies while the Adults of the congregation could take on the food and personal hygiene items.  
School Supplies most needed: crayons, glue sticks, composition notebooks, pencils 
Food and Hygiene items most needed: pasta, pasta sauce, tuna, cereal, tampons 
Drop off location: In the room off the church narthex. Items will be picked up on Sundays and Wednesdays. Collection will run from Ash Wednesday through Easter Sunday. 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~
THANK YOU for your continued support of those
in need in our communities.


Cassie Woestman, Outreach Chairperson, contact info:
Email: grammysqrd@gmail.com
Phone/Text: 610-608-5440

Announcements

+ Lenten Reading – Thanks to all who joined us last week for our engaging discussion on our All Parish Book Reading of Esther De Waal’s Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict.  The next discussion will be held on Sunday, March 21, following the morning service. Please join us – whether you’ve finished the book, started the book, or haven’t quite gotten around to it as yet. We will be using the Compline Zoom link.

+ Easter Memorial Flowers – Easter is quickly approaching.  It will be glorious times of rejoicing, remembrance, and thanksgiving.  This is true because we believe that those whom we love and see no longer will one day live again through the power and the light of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ.  This is what we celebrate at Easter. To put earthly beauty in the service of our heavenly faith in Jesus, it is our custom at Holy Apostles to remember our deceased friends and family members with a beautiful array of Easter flowers.  If you would like to participate in this custom, please send, or hand deliver the names of the deceased loved ones you would like to remember to the church office along with a donation.  The suggested donation is $8.00 per name, but please do give only as you are able and so moved. Please have your requests to us no later than March 26..To participate:

  • You can send a check along with a list of those to be remembered to the church: 1020 Remington Rd, Wynnewood PA 19096
  • You can use the Give button on our websiteto make an electronic donation. The To list has been updated to include an option for Flower Memorials. If you choose this option, you can email your list of those to be remembered to Patty Wertz or to the church office.

+ Church Service Attendance – Based on guidelines from Bishop Daniel and a corresponding vote by your Vestry, as of February 7 the maximum number of in-person attendees has been raised to 20 persons. Masks and appropriate distancing will continue to be observed. We look forward to seeing you back at church if you feel comfortable there. Services will also continue to be livestreamed. Please note that you must pre-register to attend service to allow us to  continue keeping with our safe practices. If you are serving (organist, reader, cantor, tech, usher, etc.) please remember to sign up as well.

+ Jeremiah Mustered, Ordination to the Priesthood – we are pleased to announce that Jeremiah’s ordination to the priesthood is scheduled to occur on Saturday, March 27 at St Paul’s Oaks. Details for the livestreaming of this event will be forthcoming.

+ Sunday School: Sunday School will be held online via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month for preschool (5 years old) through 8th grade.  You can join Sunday School using this link (all ages welcome):   https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89142013163?pwd=WFpJVDlZVFJhOUVVa1gxQ2k0djVndz09
We’re looking for more teachers! If you would like to be involved in this exciting ministry, contact Peter Patton: pmpatton307@gmail.com

+ Bible Study: Every Thursday at 11AM (currently on Zoom). We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. . Join us anytime using this link: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09

+ One Love: Our diocese has created an online platform where you can find inspirational videos, sermons by the bishop and other clergy, and online services.  Visit DioPA One Love Online: https://episcopalpa.online.church

+Eucharistic Visits: During this time, the rector and trained Eucharistic ministers may visit others to bring them the Eucharist. Meeting in outdoor spaces of homes will be preferred.  Contact the rector if you would like to schedule a visit. 

+Giving: You can still mail pledge contributions to the church at this time.  The mail is checked regularly.  You can also securely give online.  Go to holyapostlespa.org and click on the “Give” button on the top right hand corner of the webpage.  

+ Online Worship: Online worship continues!  We will be live-streaming each Sunday at 10AM.  We will be calling on our virtual choir to provide music for us, and there will be occasional readings from members at home.  It’s all happening on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button!

+ Happy Birthday! The following folks have birthdays in the month of March.
1st      Isabel Brown Aquino
2nd     Nancy Haas
          Matt Hillis
5th      Preslee Gallagher
6th      Christina King Smith
          Mackey Vroome
26th    Edmund Stambaugh
28th    Jennie Mustered
          Christine Vroome
31st    Alex Dupre

If your birthday, or the birthday of another parishioner in your family is missing, please notify the Parish Office at holyapostlespa@gmail.com

Our mailing address is:
1020 Remington Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096 

A Note from the Rector – 03/14/2021

Last Sunday after church we had a lovely conversation about Esther DeWaal’s book Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict.  Our discussion of Christian monasticism was wide-ranging across the topic of Christian monasticism in general, and I enjoyed it very much.  In the course of the conversation, I tangentially remarked (as I am wont to do) about the importance of the Eastern monastic prayer practice known as the Jesus Prayer.  This prayer developed out of the Desert Monastic tradition that I wrote about last week, and it is another bit of vital monastic wisdom, that is fitting and easily adaptable for our own contemporary non-monastic lives. So, I thought I would write a bit more about the Jesus Prayer and commend it to you for exploration in your own spiritual journey. 

The Jesus Prayer is simple and short: Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.  Sometimes even the “a sinner” part is left off.  The prayer is biblical.  It is based on several passages from the Gospels.  Luke 18:38, for example, when a person seeking God’s healing power cries out as Jesus passes by: “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me.”  That story provides the context and the essence of this simple and profound prayer.  The Jesus Prayer is the simple, memorable, and frankly, powerful cry of a soul to its Creator and Savior and Lord.  The cry results in Jesus hearing the supplicant, stopping, having compassion, and healing this person in need. 

The practice of the Jesus Prayer answers the impulse to follow St. Paul’s admonition in 1 Thessalonians 5:17 to “pray without ceasing.”  Monastics often pray the Jesus Prayer continuously, over and over again throughout the day.  The experience of this has been that over time—with consistent and patience practice—the Jesus Prayer becomes a prayer that prays itself, meaning that is constantly “running” in the background of your mind and heart. 

As I said, the Jesus Prayer developed out of the Desert Monastic tradition.  One Desert Father recommended to his disciples the notion of using “arrow” prayers, short, powerful prayers that are useful for avoiding temptation.  The idea is that they are “arrows” used as a counterattack against the demonic forces that desire to see the spiritual downfall of all humans.  The Jesus Prayer is such a prayer because not only is it short and easy to remember at any time, it also invokes the name of Jesus.  Scripture straight-forwardly teaches that there is power in the very name of Jesus Christ.  In John 16, Jesus tells his disciples to pray in his Name and their prayers will be answered.  In Luke, the disciples are amazed when they are able to cast out demons using the name of Jesus Christ.  In the letter to the Philippians, Paul writes: “Therefore God also highly exalted [Jesus] and gave him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bend, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:9-11).  There is transformative power in confessing the name of Jesus, this power is operative in the Jesus Prayer. 

The Jesus Prayer is often used with the aid of a prayer rope (commonly called after their Russian name “chotkis”).  The prayer rope helps to count the prayers, but it also gives your hands something to do while your mind is praying.  Prayer ought to be multi-sensory and connect the body, mind, and heart.  Traditionally, this is a circular rope made with black wool and tied with special knots.  I like the legend that surrounds their creation.  The story goes like this: one day a desert monastic was praying the Jesus Prayer and each time the prayer was prayed they tied a knot in a rope.  A demon observed this and secretly began untying the knots as soon as the monastic would tie them.  In order to confound the demon, the monastic developed a special complex knot made of dozens of crosses and tied with special prayers to prevent the demon from being able to untie it.  Prayer ropes today are often made and sold by monasteries and each one is tied with this complex and prayerful knot.  Prayer ropes come in a variety of sizes. I like the ones that have 33 knots (one for each of the years Jesus lived on the earth before the crucifixion) and can be worn on the wrist.  If you want to find a prayer rope for yourself, you can find a number of monasteries that sell them on the internet.  It is a worthy thing to support monasteries through their online gift shops.  My favorites come from this monastery in Arizona.

Acts of the Apostles – 03/07/2021

Week of March 7, 2021

This Sunday

THIRD SUNDAY IN LENT
10AM Holy Eucharist

Limited to 20 in-person attendees
Social distancing and masks required – Sign Up
Watch the broadcast on our YouTube channel
Service Material can be found on our website  
Scripture readings
Exodus 20:1-17
Psalm 19
1 Corinthians 1:18-25
John 2:13-22

A Note from the Rector

Monasticism began in the desert.  In the 3rd century Christianity was changing.  In its first two centuries, Christianity was a small, underground and persecuted movement.  But, in the 3rd century that changed dramatically, as the Emperor Constantine first decreed that Christianity would be officially tolerated in the Roman Empire, and then elevated Christianity to a preferential place in the Empire.  Suddenly, being a Christian was cool.  It quickly became the religion of the elite and those who had or wanted to have status in Roman society.  In the first two centuries, martyrdom at the hands of the empire was an important part of the identity of the church.  When that changed, the authentic spirituality of the Church (apart from those who were just looking for power or status) found that it needed to refocus.  The new focal point became the desert.  Starting in the 300s, many people from every social class heard the call of the Gospel in a radical way.  They sold all their possessions, and they took off for the desert.  At first it was just solitary hermits—ultimate experts in social distancing—but as the movement took off communities of people who shared a common life of prayer and service began to form.  The epicenter of this movement was the deserts of Egypt and Palestine.  Some of these early monastic communities are still around, for instance, St. Catherine’s Monastery near Mt. Sinai.  Over time, the wisdom and teaching of these desert monastics was collected and distributed in collections of sayings.  This material makes for excellent Lenten reading.  Notably, this was a movement in which thousands of women participated and had leadership roles.  While, male monastics have often been the focus of subsequent study and devotion, there is much evidence that women played a very prominent role in the early desert monastic movement.  [more]

Services

You can view our live-stream on our YouTube channel.  
A link to this video will be posted to Facebook.
To attend in person, please sign up to reserve your spot.

Sunday, March 7, 2021 – 3rd Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Tuesday, March 9, 2021 – The BCP Daily Office
Every Tuesday in Lent 
 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer, BCP p.75  – YouTube
12:00 PM – Noonday Prayer, BCP p.103- Zoom
 5:30 PM – Evening Prayer, BPC p.115 – YouTube
 7:30 PM – Compline, BCP p.127 – Zoom
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Sunday, March 14, 2021 – 4th Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Zoom Complineis heldevery night at 7:30PM
A brief time of prayer and checking in with other members of CHA
“Zoom Compline has been really helped me through this difficult time.  It’s such a great way to close the day.” – CHA Member
Follow this link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/233415613?pwd=dTBDeUhrUUdSak9MS3RUaXdDSDhpUT09
or call into the meeting toll-free 1-888-475-4499 Callers will be promoted to enter this meeting ID: 233 415 613
and passcode: love

Zoom Bible Study is held every Thursday at 11AM
We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. 
Follow this link to join:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09
or call 1-888-475-4499 US Toll-free
You will be prompted to enter this meeting ID: 788 355 291 and passcode: love

*note: the passcode for all CHA Zoom meetings is “love”

Outreach – Up Next

Lenten Service Project
Objective:
To show continued support for helping with food scarcity issues in the community
Those who oppress the poor insult their Maker, but those who are kind to the needy honor him..
Proverbs 14:31 NRSV
~ ~ ~ ~ ~
Darby Mission

During Lent our goal is to help stock and replenish the Darby mission Food Pantry and School Supplies. Below is a “top ten” list of items that would be required to meet the needs of Rev. Doris’ clients. Other non-perishable items also accepted. Children and Youth could be encouraged to concentrate on school supplies while the Adults of the congregation could take on the food and personal hygiene items.  
School Supplies most needed: crayons, glue sticks, composition notebooks, pencils 
Food and Hygiene items most needed: pasta, pasta sauce, tuna, cereal, tampons 
Drop off location: In the room off the church narthex. Items will be picked up on Sundays and Wednesdays. Collection will run from Ash Wednesday through Easter Sunday. 

Connect by night

Some have asked about delivering pizzas or donuts and coffee directly to the mission. You can deliver these items, or have them delivered, to: Connect By Night, 7200 Court Ave, Upper Darby PA 19082

THANK YOU for your continued support of those
in need in our communities.

 
Cassie Woestman, Outreach Chairperson, contact info:
Email: grammysqrd@gmail.com
Phone/Text: 610-608-5440

Announcements

+ Casting call for the reading of the Passion Children and adults alike are invited to participate in a pre-recorded video reading of the Passion According to St. Mark for our Palm Sunday service.  We have small and large parts available, as well as several small groups (disciples, accusers, crowd, etc.) which are great opportunities for families to participate together.  Please email Judi or Joe Zorc at kraft@chop.edu or zorc@chop.edu, and we will assign you a role according to your preference.  You can record in your own home and submit your video to Joe by Friday, March 19th. 

+ Lenten Reading – THIS SUNDAY beginning at 11:15am we will be having our first group discussion of our All Parish Book Reading of Esther De Waal’s Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict  Please join us – whether you’ve finished the book, started the book, or haven’t quite gotten around to it as yet. We will be using the Compline Zoom link.

+ Church Service Attendance – Based on guidelines from Bishop Daniel and a corresponding vote by your Vestry, beginning February 7 the maximum number of attendees will be raised to 20 persons. Masks and appropriate distancing will continue to be observed. We look forward to seeing you back at church if you feel comfortable there. Services will also continue to be livestreamed. Please note that you must pre-register to attend service to allow us to  continue keeping with our safe practices. If you are serving (organist, reader, cantor, tech, usher, etc.) please remember to sign up as well.

+ Sunday School: Sunday School will be held online via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month for preschool (5 years old) through 8th grade.  You can join Sunday School using this link (all ages welcome):   https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89142013163?pwd=WFpJVDlZVFJhOUVVa1gxQ2k0djVndz09
We’re looking for more teachers! If you would like to be involved in this exciting ministry, contact Peter Patton: pmpatton307@gmail.com

+ Bible Study: Every Thursday at 11AM (currently on Zoom). We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. . Join us anytime using this link: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09

+ One Love: Our diocese has created an online platform where you can find inspirational videos, sermons by the bishop and other clergy, and online services.  Visit DioPA One Love Online: https://episcopalpa.online.church

+Eucharistic Visits: During this time, the rector and trained Eucharistic ministers may visit others to bring them the Eucharist. Meeting in outdoor spaces of homes will be preferred.  Contact the rector if you would like to schedule a visit. 

+Giving: You can still mail pledge contributions to the church at this time.  The mail is checked regularly.  You can also securely give online.  Go to holyapostlespa.org and click on the “Give” button on the top right hand corner of the webpage.  

+ Online Worship: Online worship continues!  We will be live-streaming each Sunday at 10AM.  We will be calling on our virtual choir to provide music for us, and there will be occasional readings from members at home.  It’s all happening on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button!

+ Happy Birthday! The following folks have birthdays in the month of March.
1st      Isabel Brown Aquino
2nd     Nancy Haas
          Matt Hillis
5th      Preslee Gallagher
6th      Christina King Smith
          Mackey Vroome
26th    Edmund Stambaugh
28th    Jennie Mustered
          Christine Vroome
31st    Alex Dupre
If your birthday, or the birthday of another parishioner in your family is missing, please notify the Parish Office at holyapostlespa@gmail.com

Our mailing address is:
1020 Remington Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096 

A Note from the Rector – 03/07/2021

Monasticism began in the desert.  In the 3rd century Christianity was changing.  In its first two centuries, Christianity was a small, underground and persecuted movement.  But, in the 3rd century that changed dramatically, as the Emperor Constantine first decreed that Christianity would be officially tolerated in the Roman Empire, and then elevated Christianity to a preferential place in the Empire.  Suddenly, being a Christian was cool.  It quickly became the religion of the elite and those who had or wanted to have status in Roman society.  In the first two centuries, martyrdom at the hands of the empire was an important part of the identity of the church.  When that changed, the authentic spirituality of the Church (apart from those who were just looking for power or status) found that it needed to refocus.  The new focal point became the desert.  Starting in the 300s, many people from every social class heard the call of the Gospel in a radical way.  They sold all their possessions, and they took off for the desert.  At first it was just solitary hermits—ultimate experts in social distancing—but as the movement took off communities of people who shared a common life of prayer and service began to form.  The epicenter of this movement was the deserts of Egypt and Palestine.  Some of these early monastic communities are still around, for instance, St. Catherine’s Monastery near Mt. Sinai.  Over time, the wisdom and teaching of these desert monastics was collected and distributed in collections of sayings.  This material makes for excellent Lenten reading.  Notably, this was a movement in which thousands of women participated and had leadership roles.  While, male monastics have often been the focus of subsequent study and devotion, there is much evidence that women played a very prominent role in the early desert monastic movement. 

Three excellent examples, worthily deemed Desert Mothers, are Sarah, Theodora, and Syncletica, They are commemorated in the Episcopal Church’s calendar on January 5th.  Of the thousand women monastics whose names were recorded, and the thousands more who remained anonymous, these three were included in the collections of monastic wisdom known as the Sayings of the Desert Fathers. Forty-two sayings out of just over one thousand are attributed to these women.  Yet, their contributions to monastic wisdom are both significant and in continuity with the tradition as a whole.

The Sayings preserve twenty-seven examples of Syncletica’s wisdom, more than all but seven of the Fathers and Mothers who appear in the collection.  Syncletica’s sayings are characterized by a pragmatism that tempered the most extreme displays of asceticism, and a realistic understanding of human nature.  In line with much of desert monastic wisdom, Syncletica taught that humility is central to the monastic life, “Just as one cannot build a ship without nails, so it is impossible to be saved without humility.” 

As a scion of a wealthy family and widow of a Roman tribune, Theodora began her time in the desert disguised as a man, hiding from any deferment she may have received.  Eventually she became the Amma (literally “mother,” i.e. spiritual leader) of a community of women near Alexandria, where she was sought for spiritual council by many prominent monastics and clergy, including the Patriarch of Alexandria (the most prominent bishop in the area). 

Sarah was a hermit who lived near Scetis in the northwest Nile Delta of Egypt.  She was so devoted to prayer during her 60 years as a hermit that, it is said, she never once looked up from praying to take in the view of the Nile visible from her hermitage.  Once, a group of male monastics visited Sarah with the purpose of humiliating and demeaning her.  Their assumption of superiority over female monastics exposes their spiritual pride for what it is.  When they confronted Sarah and ironically chided her for being a prideful woman, she said to them, “According to nature I am a woman, but not according to my thoughts.”  She is also recorded as saying to (presumably the same) monastic brethren, “It is I who am a man, you are the women.”  Whatever we moderns might make of her gender politics, Sarah’s sayings demonstrate that she refused to allow the gender bias of others to interfere with her own piety and vocation as a spiritual guide and teacher. 

It is long past time to understand and appreciate the pivotal role of women in monasticism, spirituality, and every other aspect of the Church’s life and faith.  It is beneficial to learn from the examples of Sarah, Theodora, and Syncletica and heed their wisdom, which transcends their ancient monastic context and speaks to our own.  It is fitting to venerate these saintly women for their holiness and their devotion to prayer.  They do the one job of every true saint—they point us toward Jesus Christ.  

This Note has been adapted from an article that I wrote for the Living Church.

Acts of the Apostles – 02/28/2021

February 28, 2021

This Sunday

SECOND SUNDAY IN LENT
10AM Holy Eucharist
Limited to 20 in-person attendees
Social distancing and masks required – Sign Up
Watch the broadcast on our YouTube channel
Service Material can be found on our website  

Scripture readings
Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16
Psalm 22:22-30
Romans 4:13-25
Mark 8:31-38

A Note from the Rector

The vestry met last Sunday and the property committee had a meeting Wednesday. A number of property related concerns were discussed, from the fact that all this snow is going to mean a big bill from the from company that plows our parking lot to a number of repair and maintenance projects at the church and at the rectory. Of course, I am never content NOT to turn everything into a theological reflection, so this got me thinking about our parish property in relationship to the themes of Lent and especially in relationship to the theme of monastic wisdom for non-monastic people like you and me. The first thing to say is that we can be grateful for our beautiful 70 year old church building. It is a gift from God and, like all such gifts, it requires good stewardship on our part. We have to care for it, or it will fall apart. 
 
One of the marks of Christian monasticism is that monastics take several vows.  These vows differ slightly depending on which Order or “flavor” of monasticism is being considered. The Most common in the Western Church is a monastery that follows the Rule of St. Benedict. This flavor of monasticism calls for three vows: fidelity to the monastic way of life, obedience to the rule and to one’s abbot/abbess (the head of the monastery), and stability. It is this last vow that comes to mind in relationship to the maintenance of our property and to our parish in general. Simply put, the vow of stability means that someone promises to stay put. [more]

Services

You can view our live-stream on our YouTube channel.  
A link to this video will be posted to Facebook.
To attend in person, please sign up to reserve your spot.

Sunday, February 28, 2021 – 2nd Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Tuesday, February 30, 2021 – The BCP Daily Office
Every Tuesday in Lent 
 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer, BCP p.75  – YouTube
12:00 PM – Noonday Prayer, BCP p.103- Zoom
 5:30 PM – Evening Prayer, BPC p.115 – YouTube
 7:30 PM – Compline, BCP p.127 – Zoom
The Rev. James Stambaugh, officiant

Sunday, March 7, 2021 – 3rd Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Zoom Complineis heldevery night at 7:30PM
A brief time of prayer and checking in with other members of CHA
“Zoom Compline has been really helped me through this difficult time.  It’s such a great way to close the day.” – CHA Member
Follow this link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/233415613?pwd=dTBDeUhrUUdSak9MS3RUaXdDSDhpUT09
or call into the meeting toll-free 1-888-475-4499 
Callers will be promoted to enter this meeting ID: 233 415 613
and passcode: love

Zoom Bible Study is held every Thursday at 11AM
We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. Follow this link to join:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09
or call 1-888-475-4499 US Toll-free
You will be prompted to enter this meeting ID: 788 355 291
and passcode: love

*note: the passcode for all CHA Zoom meetings is “love”

Outreach – Up Next

Lenten Service Project
Objective: To show continued support for helping with food scarcity issues in the community
If you offer your food to the hungry and satisfy the needs of the afflicted,
then your light shall rise in the darkness and your gloom be like the noonday.
Isaiah 58:10 NRSV

Darby Mission

During Lent our goal is to help stock and replenish the Darby mission Food Pantry and School Supplies. Below is a “top ten” list of items that would be required to meet the needs of Rev. Doris’ clients. Other non-perishable items also accepted. Children and Youth could be encouraged to concentrate on school supplies while the Adults of the congregation could take on the food and personal hygiene items. 

School Supplies most needed: crayons, glue sticks, composition notebooks, pencils
Food and Hygiene items most needed: pasta, pasta sauce, tuna, cereal, tampons

Drop off location: In the room off the church narthex. Items will be picked up on Sundays and Wednesdays. Collection will run from Ash Wednesday through Easter Sunday.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Connect by Night

The Simple Supper planned for March has been postponed.
Some have asked about delivering pizzas or donuts and coffee directly to the mission. You can deliver these items, or have them delivered, to:

Connect By Night
7200 Court Ave
Upper Darby PA 19082

THANK YOU for your continued support of those in need in our communities.

Cassie Woestman, Outreach Chairperson, contact info:
Email: grammysqrd@gmail.com
Phone/Text: 610-608-5440

Announcements

+ Casting call for the reading of the Passion Children and adults alike are invited to participate in a pre-recorded video reading of the Passion According to St. Mark for our Palm Sunday service.  We have small and large parts available, as well as several small groups (disciples, accusers, crowd, etc.) which are great opportunities for families to participate together.  Please email Judi or Joe Zorc at kraft@chop.edu or zorc@chop.edu, and we will assign you a role according to your preference.  You can record in your own home and submit your video to Joe by Friday, March 19th. 

+ Lenten Reading – There is still time to prepare for this year’s All Parish Book Reading and Discussion. We will read a short, intriguing, and enjoyable book by Esther De Waal entitled Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict
(Liturgical Press, 1984, updated 2001) There will be two opportunities to discuss this book together via Zoom on Sunday March 7th and Sunday March 21st, after the morning service. You are also welcome just to read the book on your own! You can find the book on Amazon or at an independent bookstore such as Eighth Day Books or Hearts and Minds Books.

+ Church Service Attendance – Based on guidelines from Bishop Daniel and a corresponding vote by your Vestry, beginning February 7 the maximum number of attendees will be raised to 20 persons. Masks and appropriate distancing will continue to be observed. We look forward to seeing you back at church if you feel comfortable there. Services will also continue to be livestreamed. Please note that you must pre-register to attend service to allow us to  continue keeping with our safe practices. If you are serving (organist, reader, cantor, tech, usher, etc.) please remember to sign up as well.

+  Hidden in Plain Sight: The History of Slavery in Haverford Township  on Wednesday, March 3 at 7 pm on Zoom. Join the Haverford Township Free Library for a presentation on the public history project Colin McCrossan, a recent graduate of McGill University, Haverford High School graduate, and township resident will present his new research about the history of slavery in Haverford Township. Come learn about this history through the eyes of: a young Black woman and girl who escaped from their slave owner in the dead of winter;  a Quaker farmer who enslaved a Black man and only freed him to avoid excommunication; a Black man who freed himself from enslavement and the Irish tavern keeper who spent over two years trying to recapture him. The Haverford Township Free Library is hosting this program and welcomes all to attend, but asks that you register in advance

+ Sunday School: Sunday School will be held online via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month for preschool (5 years old) through 8th grade.  You can join Sunday School using this link (all ages welcome):  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89142013163?pwd=WFpJVDlZVFJhOUVVa1gxQ2k0djVndz09
We’re looking for more teachers! If you would like to be involved in this exciting ministry, contact Peter Patton: pmpatton307@gmail.com

+ Bible Study: Every Thursday at 11AM (currently on Zoom). We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. . Join us anytime using this link: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09

+ One Love: Our diocese has created an online platform where you can find inspirational videos, sermons by the bishop and other clergy, and online services.  Visit DioPA One Love Online: https://episcopalpa.online.church

+Eucharistic Visits: During this time, the rector and trained Eucharistic ministers may visit others to bring them the Eucharist. Meeting in outdoor spaces of homes will be preferred.  Contact the rector if you would like to schedule a visit. 

+Giving: You can still mail pledge contributions to the church at this time.  The mail is checked regularly.  You can also securely give online.  Go to holyapostlespa.org and click on the “Give” button on the top right hand corner of the webpage.  

+ Online Worship: Online worship continues!  We will be live-streaming each Sunday at 10AM.  We will be calling on our virtual choir to provide music for us, and there will be occasional readings from members at home.  It’s all happening on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button!

+ Happy Birthday! The following folks have birthdays in the month of March.
1st      Isabel Brown Aquino
2nd     Nancy Haas
          Matt Hillis
5th      Preslee Gallagher
6th      Christina King Smith
          Mackey Vroome
26th    Edmund Stambaugh
28th    Jennie Mustered
          Christine Vroome
31st    Alex Dupre

If your birthday, or the birthday of another parishioner in your family is missing, please notify the Parish Office at holyapostlespa@gmail.com

Our mailing address is:
1020 Remington Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096 

A Note from the Rector – 02/28/2021

The vestry met last Sunday and the property committee had a meeting Wednesday. A number of property related concerns were discussed, from the fact that all this snow is going to mean a big bill from the from company that plows our parking lot to a number of repair and maintenance projects at the church and at the rectory. Of course, I am never content NOT to turn everything into a theological reflection, so this got me thinking about our parish property in relationship to the themes of Lent and especially in relationship to the theme of monastic wisdom for non-monastic people like you and me. The first thing to say is that we can be grateful for our beautiful 70 year old church building. It is a gift from God and, like all such gifts, it requires good stewardship on our part. We have to care for it, or it will fall apart. 

One of the marks of Christian monasticism is that monastics take several vows. These vows differ slightly depending on which Order or “flavor” of monasticism is being considered. The Most common in the Western Church is a monastery that follows the Rule of St. Benedict. This flavor of monasticism calls for three vows: fidelity to the monastic way of life, obedience to the rule and to one’s abbot/abbess (the head of the monastery), and stability. It is this last vow that comes to mind in relationship to the maintenance of our property and to our parish in general. Simply put, the vow of stability means that someone promises to stay put. Benedictine monks or nuns do not move around much. Most commit to staying in the same monastery for their entire life as a monastic. This is because they recognize that there is spiritual value in staying in one place. It is good for one’s soul to be content with the circumstances at hand, and to commit to cultivating a place for the long haul. There is a certain humility involved. Also, it gives one the opportunity to really pay attention to your surroundings, to your soul, and finally to God. This is counter-cultural in a society, like ours, that is extremely mobile. I mean, here I am writing 1500 miles away from the place where I was born! But, the whole notion of a parish is founded on the principle of stability—on a commitment to a singular place, a singular, bounded area, a neighborhood. 

I love the way that Eugene Peterson paraphrased the beginning of the Gospel of John in The Message: “The Word became flesh and moved into the neighborhood” (John 1:14). Jesus became human and lived in a specific, bounded place and time; he moved into the neighborhood! We too find ourselves in a particular context, and our call is to be disciples of Jesus where we are at. We are called to move into the neighborhood and incarnate the Body of Christ right there in the place we find ourselves. We are called to cultivate our place to make it a place to belong. Our parish is a particular outpost of God’s kingdom that is located here, in Penn Wynne, straddling two counties and two townships, situated near a park, with a small wood behind it. A stream flows under our parking lot and right across the front of our church building (buried underground). Our buildings matter in the grand scheme of things because of the incarnation. Our buildings represent the (literal) concrete embodiment of God’s grace. They are a vow of stability that our church has made to the neighborhood. They say, “we are here for you, and we’re sticking around.” As the context for countless church services and life events, our building has a special place in our hearts and imaginations. This is good.

The pandemic has, of course, forced us to see our church building much less. I spend less time there than I did before the pandemic, and I know there are some of you haven’t set foot inside the building in almost a year. With travel restrictions and increased danger, most of us have not move around as much as we are accustomed to. Even so, our call is the same—to be disciples of Jesus where we are at. To cultivate our limited circumstances as an outpost of the Kingdom of God. Right now we have the opportunity to be more attentive. To humbly accept our circumstances and limitations and to really pay attention to where we find ourselves physically and spiritually. 

We take awe-filled and wonder-full things for granted all around us every day. The monastic wisdom of stability—of staying put, invites us to be present in a grace-filled, incarnational way to the place where we are at; to see how God’s kingdom is moving into the neighborhood, our backyard, our living room. Let it also inspire us to make our neighborhoods and homes better. Let it inspire us to pray—“In Penn Wynne or Havertown as it is heaven.”

So, here’s a strange sounding, but truly profound spiritual practice for you: Have you ever stopped and paid absolute, total attention to just 1 square foot of your backyard? Try it! Find a patch of grass and spend a very intentional 30 minutes, focusing all your senses on nothing else. Listen to the sounds of your backyard. Look at the muddy, messy, wonder that is all around you. Leave your phone inside. You are guaranteed to be astonished at the near infinite amount of fascinating, incredible, mind-blowing details packed into such a small, ordinary place. You will come away more grateful to your Creator and more at peace with yourself. 

Acts of the Apostles – 02/14/2021

Week of February 14, 2021

This Sunday

10AM Holy Eucharist
Limited to 20 in-person attendees – Social distancing and masks required – Sign Up
Watch the broadcast on our YouTube channel
Service Material can be found on our website
Scripture readings – Last Sunday after Epiphany – Celebrating the Feast of Absalom Jones
Isaiah 42:5–9
Psalm 126
2 Corinthians 4:3-6
John 15:12–15

A Note from the Rector

Lent begins with Ash Wednesday this week (see the Ash Wednesday plan here).  I’ve chosen to center our Lenten offerings this year around a theme: “Monastic Wisdom for Non-Monastics in an Anxious World.”  Ok, it’s a long-winded theme, but stick with me. 

I am aware that our perceptions and notions of monks and nuns are going to vary widely.  Some of us were educated in Roman Catholic schools where you had monastics teachers.  I know that some of you had excellent experiences, and some not so much.  Others of you will know that there is a long tradition of monasticism in Anglicanism, and might be curious about that or other traditions.  Others may not have any reference point or knowledge of monasticism outside of bits and pieces picked up at church or from popular culture.  Monasticism is a pretty wild idea, actually.  The idea that there are people who feel called to make some kind of commitment to live a different kind of life, “in the world, but not of the world,” together in a community (or as a hermit), following a rule of life that includes enormous amounts of prayer and study, holding personal possessions in common, and agreeing to be celibate—all of this is very counter-cultural.  Monasticism may seem like a rarified pursuit, far removed from the experiences and concerns of us, and our parish.  In reality, I believe the opposite is true.  [more]

Services

You can view our live-stream on our YouTube channel.  
A link to this video will be posted to Facebook.
To attend in person, please sign up to reserve your spot.

Sunday, February 14, 2021 – Last Sunday after the Epiphany,
Celebrating the Feast of Absalom Jones 

Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Wednesday, February 17, 2021 – Ash Wednesday
Ashes to Go 8:00-9:15AM
In the church parking lot. Please see last week’s “A Note from the Rector” for details on the safe practices that will be in place.

Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 12:15PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 6:30PM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

Sunday, February 21, 2021 – 1st Sunday of Lent
Holy Eucharist, Rite II with Prayers of Spiritual Communion 10AM
Live-streamed, In-person attendance limited to 20
The Rev. James Stambaugh, celebrant & preacher

The BCP Daily Office
Tuesdays in Lent – Feb 23, Mar 2, Mar 9, Mar 16, Mar 23, Mar 30
 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer – YouTube
12:00 PM – Noonday Prayer – Zoom
 5:30 PM – Evening Prayer – YouTube
 7:30 PM – Compline – Zoom

Zoom Compline is held every night at 7:30PM
A brief time of prayer and checking in with other members of CHA
“Zoom Compline has been really helped me through this difficult time.  It’s such a great way to close the day.” – CHA Member
Follow this link to join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/233415613?pwd=dTBDeUhrUUdSak9MS3RUaXdDSDhpUT09
or call into the meeting toll-free 1-888-475-4499 
Callers will be promoted to enter this meeting ID: 233 415 613
and passcode: love

Zoom Bible Studyis held every Thursday at 11AM
We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. 
Follow this link to join:  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09
or call 1-888-475-4499 US Toll-free
You will be prompted to enter this meeting ID: 788 355 291
and passcode: love
*note: the passcode for all CHA Zoom meetings is “love”

Outreach – Up Next

Lenten Service Projects
Objective:
To show continued support for helping with
food scarcity issues in the community

Do not neglect to do good and to share what you have,
for such sacrifices are pleasing to God. Hebrews 13:16 NRSV

Connect by Night
We would like to provide some simple suppers, reminiscent of our own Soup Group Nights at CHA. 
What: Simple Suppers – 2 events
When: Wednesday, February 17 and Wednesday, March 10
Menu: Multiple crocks of soup for 10-12, Crusty bread, Cheese plate, Fresh Fruit

Still needed for THIS WEDNESDAY, February 17:
2 more crocks of soup
Fresh Fruit – preferably whole oranges, apples, grapes

Please contact Cassie to volunteer to provide for one or both of these dinners!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Darby Mission
During Lent our goal is to help stock and replenish the Darby mission Food Pantry and School Supplies. Below is a “top ten” list of items that would be required to meet the needs of Rev. Doris’ clients. Other non-perishable items also accepted. Children and Youth could be encouraged to concentrate on school supplies while the Adults of the congregation could take on the food and personal hygiene items.  
School Supplies most needed: crayons, glue sticks, composition notebooks, pencils 
Food and Hygiene items most needed: pasta, pasta sauce, tuna, cereal, tampons 

Drop off locations:
In or near the designated box in the church narthex 
27 Kathmere Rd, Havertown
Ship directly to CHA when ordering on line

Collection will run from Ash Wednesday through Easter Sunday. If you can offer to be an additional collection location, please contact Cassie.

THANK YOU for your continued support of those in need in our communities.
Cassie Woestman, Outreach Chairperson, contact info:
Email: grammysqrd@gmail.com
Phone/Text: 610-608-5440

Announcements

+ Lenten Services – Follow the [more] link on the Note from the Rector to get all the information on services being offered from Ash Wednesday through Easter Sunday.

+ Lenten Reading – Lent starts this week!  This year you are invited to participate in an All Parish Book Reading and Discussion. We will read a short, intriguing, and enjoyable book by Esther De Waal entitled Seeking God: The Way of St. Benedict (Liturgical Press, 1984, updated 2001) There will be two opportunities to discuss this book together via Zoom on Sunday March 7th and Sunday March 21st,  after the morning service. You are also welcome just to read the book on your own! You can find the book on Amazon or at an independent bookstore such as Eighth Day Books or Hearts and Minds Books.

+ Church Service Attendance – Based on guidelines from Bishop Daniel and a corresponding vote by your Vestry, beginning February 7 the maximum number of attendees will be raised to 20 persons. Masks and appropriate distancing will continue to be observed. We look forward to seeing you back at church if you feel comfortable there. Services will also continue to be livestreamed. Please note that you must pre-register to attend service to allow us to  continue keeping with our safe practices. If you are serving (organist, reader, cantor, tech, usher, etc.) please remember to sign up as well.

+ Sunday School: Sunday School will be held online via Zoom on the 1st and 3rd Sundays of the month for preschool (5 years old) through 8th grade.  You can join Sunday School using this link (all ages welcome):  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89142013163?pwd=WFpJVDlZVFJhOUVVa1gxQ2k0djVndz09
We’re looking for more teachers! If you would like to be involved in this exciting ministry, contact Peter Patton: pmpatton307@gmail.com

+ Bible Study: Every Thursday at 11AM (currently on Zoom). We are just starting a combined study of the Books of Daniel and Revelation. Now is a great time to join us as we get ready to discover a new view on the never-changing promises of God. . Join us anytime using this link: 
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/788355291?pwd=R2FQRWltZ01LWG92WGtPSm54cXJSUT09

+ Girl Scout Cookies are here! Click here to place an online order or go to: 
https://app.abcsmartcookies.com/#/social-link-landing/d209b161-8f30-4958-aa36-8807e0d457b1  You can choose shipping, or girl delivery with a credit card. You can also contact Michelle Gallagher directly and use cash, check, Venmo, PayPal, etc. Emma can deliver or set up a time to meet (socially distanced) in the church parking lot.  Emma Gallagher says “thank you for your support of our troop!” Cookie sales run from January 21- March 14.

+ One Love: Our diocese has created an online platform where you can find inspirational videos, sermons by the bishop and other clergy, and online services.  Visit DioPA One Love Online: https://episcopalpa.online.church

+Eucharistic Visits: During this time, the rector and trained Eucharistic ministers may visit others to bring them the Eucharist. Meeting in outdoor spaces of homes will be preferred.  Contact the rector if you would like to schedule a visit. 

+Giving: You can still mail pledge contributions to the church at this time.  The mail is checked regularly.  You can also securely give online.  Go to holyapostlespa.org and click on the “Give” button on the top right hand corner of the webpage.  

+ Online Worship: Online worship continues!  We will be live-streaming each Sunday at 10AM.  We will be calling on our virtual choir to provide music for us, and there will be occasional readings from members at home.  It’s all happening on our YouTube Channel. Be sure to hit the SUBSCRIBE button!

+ Happy Birthday! The following folks have birthdays in the month of February.
6th      Carter Grant
12th    Jamieson Henderson
17th    Mike Johnson
19th    Annie Neff
          Jamison Grant
23rd    Lyn DeSilets
          Lucas Johnson
24th    Jeremiah Mustered
27th    Meg Delevan
          Alice Vroome
28th    Braeden Wherry
          Colin Vroome
If your birthday, or the birthday of another parishioner in your family is missing, please notify the Parish Office at holyapostlespa@gmail.com

Our mailing address is:
1020 Remington Road, Wynnewood, PA 19096