A Note from the Rector – 3/17/19

Welcome to the Second Sunday in Lent, which also happens to be St. Patrick’s Day.  Except for major feasts of Our Lord, whenever a saint’s feast day falls on a Sunday, it is transferred to the next day.  So, in the church’s mind, St. Patrick’s day is celebrated tomorrow (in case you want to wear your “Kiss Me I’m Irish” shirt tomorrow also).  This is because Sunday is always a major feast of the Resurrection.  Every Sunday is Easter Sunday, in other words.  As awesome as St. Pat is, he doesn’t hold a candle to the glorious resurrection of our Lord and Savior.  It also means that while it is a Sunday IN Lent, it is not really a Sunday OF Lent, because Sunday is always Easter.  In fact, the 6 Sundays that occur during the season of Lent are not counted in the 40 days of Lent.  Do with that information what you will.

After today’s 10AM service we are holding an Anglican Prayer Bead workshop in the Memorial Room.  Let me tell you about prayer beads.  First, it is interesting to note that the English word “bead” descends from the medieval Old English word “bede,” which means “prayer.” This testifies to how important prayer beads have been to the spiritual lives of many.

They are an aid to help us focus in prayer.  Being human means that we are spiritual and physical beings.  Many of us find it helpful, then, to have physical components to our spiritual prayer.  Prayer beads give our hands something to do, which somehow frees up some mental and emotional space and helps to focus and concentrate our prayer.  Body, mind, and spirit are connected in mysterious ways.

This embodied, contemplative practice of using objects to count prayers is very old—probably first developed in the Hindu religion over 5,000 years ago.  Many major world religions have their own version of prayer beads.  In the earliest days of Eastern Christian monasticism, monks used pebbles to count their prayers.  This practiced developed over time (4thand 5thcenturies) into beaded or knotted ropes that monks would hold and use to count their prayers. Made out of wool, and tied with a special (and very complicated) knot, prayer ropes (commonly called after their Russian name “chotkis) are still very much in use in the Eastern Christian world.  The prayer used most often with these prayer ropes is called the Jesus Prayer: “Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.”  This prayer is based on several passages form the Gospels, mainly from Luke 18:38 when a blind man outside Jericho cries out to Jesus as he passes by: “Jesus, Son of David, have mercy on me.”

In the West, this practice showed up first in Ireland, in the 9thcentury monastic communities of St. Columba.  It spread throughout Europe and developed in the later middle ages into the Rosary—the “rose garden”, that is still in common use by Roman Catholics, as well as Anglicans and even a Lutheran or two.  The traditional use of the Rosary calls for three main prayers: the “Hail Mary” (derived mostly from several passage of the Gospel of Luke chapter 1), the Lord’s Prayer, and the “Glory Be” (Glory be to the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit…).

Sometime in the 1980s an Episcopal priest along with the contemplative prayer group at her parish, developed a simplified version of the Rosary.  They called it the Anglican Rosary.  It uses 33 beads to signify the 33 years of Jesus’ life.  Diverse prayers have been used with the Anglican Rosary, but they have always been closely derived or inspired by Scripture (as, indeed, all the prayers mentioned so far have been).  Our workshop is going to be fun for all ages.  This is a great way to teach children about prayer.  See you there!

A Note from the Rector – 3/10/19

Today is the first Sunday of the season of Lent.  This morning we join in the prayers of the Church using a very ancient form of prayer—the Great Litany.  The Great Litany is the real deal; the big time; the major leagues of prayer.  This prayer was first assembled in response to a 4th century volcanic eruption.  It was further shaped by political uncertainty, war, and medieval outbreaks of the Black Plague in Europe.  In 1544, the Great Litany was the first part of the Liturgy to be translated (and heavily edited) into vernacular English by Thomas Cranmer.  Five years later Cranmer finished the first Book of Common Prayer, which stands at the fountainhead of our own style of worship.  Cranmer’s version of the Litany melded medieval catholic spirituality with the theological concerns of the Reformation.  Martin Luther’s hand can still be detected on the version of the Litany that is in our prayer book.

At one time, the Great Litany was prayed by every Anglican parish every Sunday.  These days, even though it is included in our version of the prayer book, it has fallen into disuse.  This is a real shame. As one scholar writes, the Litany is “a most careful, luminous, and comprehensive collection of the scattered treasures of the Universal Church.”  It holds together the reformed and catholic strands of our tradition, and it articulates the needs, anxieties, and suffering of humanity with a power that is rare.  More than that, the Litany is a profound reminder that we need to rely on the grace and mercy of God.  This is equally true today as it was in the 4th century, or the 14th.  Our life depends on God, whether we recognize it or not.  And the fact is, we often don’t recognize it.  Lent is a good time to correct that, so let’s do it with style.

This morning’s service is going to feel different.  We will begin the service by chanting together this ancient, beautiful prayer. The choir is going to march around the church really slow, and any children present might feel like joining in the march, which would be ideal as far as I am concerned.  My experience is that children intuitively understand the grandest and most sublime parts of liturgy, even if their response to them don’t always strike us adults as appropriate.  It’s going to take some time to chant the Great Litany, which is okay.  Don’t be anxious.  This is an opportunity to lose yourself in the mystery and the majesty of something bigger than you, something more important (really, it is) than the busyness and anxieties and luxuries of everyday life.  I promise it will be worth it.  I also promise to keep my sermon short.  🙂

For more on the history and use of the Great Litany see this excellent article from the Living Church magazine.

Holy Land Update 2/2/19

Dear Holy Apostles,

I have found it more difficult than I expected to write long updates about the pilgrimage I am on in the Holy Land.  Our local guide, Iyad, keeps us very busy, and every evening we have had that exhausted but happy feeling.  If you use Facebook, you will see a lot of pictures and brief updates on my page.

I am writing to you from Nazareth in Galilee, the town where Jesus grew up.  We are staying very close to the Roman Catholic Basilica of the Annunciation, which is built over a cave that from very early on was revered as the home of Mary, and the place where the angel Gabriel visited her to announce that she would conceive a son who was to be named Jesus.  Nazareth used to be a small village of several hundred people, today there are over 100,000 people here.  It has one of the largest Christian populations in Israel, about 30% of the population are Arab Christians.  The rest are Muslim and Jews.  It is a wonderful place.  As Jerusalem is to New York: huge, chaotic, cosmopolitian; Nazareth is to Philadelphia, still a significant and fascinating city full of history, but a bit more laid back.  That’s my sense of the place, anyway.

We came to Galilee, the northern section of Israel, yesterday.  Before that we were staying in East Jerusalem, near the old city at the Anglican Cathedral guest house.  Jerusalem is an overwhelming and intoxicating place.  There is a so much bustle, so many people, so many street vendors selling everything under the sun.  In the old city there are holy sites and interesting historical sites literally at every turn.  Layer upon layer of history is built up here, and it is a fascinating, beautiful place. One day last week we visited the Western Wall, the holiest place in Judaism.  I wrote the prayers you sent with me and more on a sheet of my journal and crammed with thousands more prayers into the cracks of that wall, which is part of a giant retaining wall that Herod the Great built around the Temple mount.  On the temple mount itself (a place Jews are forbidden by Israeli law to go) is the Dome of the Rock, the second holiest site of Islam.  As a Christian, I am forbidden to pray there.  The next day we went to the Holy Sepulchre which is the holiest site of Christianity.  There is Golgotha, the place of the skull where our Lord breathed his last.  Fifty yards away, housed in a church within a church, is a marble slab which covers what is left of the bench on which Christ’s body was placed after he was crucified to death.  It is almost certainly THE place.  Archeology proves that around AD 135, the Roman emperor Hadrian destroyed a first or second century structure and built a Roman temple on top of it.  He was trying to destroy the memory of every Jewish holy site, including the sites of any sect—like Christianity—that was associated with the Judaism.  When St. Helena, Constantine’s mom, arrived in Jerusalem in the early 4thcentury, local Christians (there have always been Christians in the Holy Land) had no trouble showing her the site.  She had the Roman temple removed, and used some of the pieces to build the first church of the Holy Sepulchre.  This church was destroyed when the Persians conquered Jerusalem in the 7thcentury, and rebuilt by the Crusaders in the eleventh century.  Recent archeology has discovered that Christians in the second and third century built a tunnel underneath the Roman temple to get as close as they could to the site that has always been known to be the place Jesus was raised from the dead.  The current church is a cacophony of architectural eras, as new churches, and even renovations and additions were added while salvaging parts of the old.  Six different Christian denominations share the space.  I kissed the spot where Jesus’ cross stood atop Golgotha, and I laid my head on the marble stab of his tomb.  I can’t describe how moving and faith affirming it was.  Deb and I returned to the church the following morning when it opened (at 4AM!) and witnessed several beautiful services.  Thousands upon thousands visit the church everyday, people from all over, speaking dozens of languages—tourists and pilgrims alike.  It may seem off-puting that the holiest site of our religion is so chaotic.  But, even being jostled in the crowds, it was so moving.  Every language, tribe, nation and tongue coming there, in order to fall at the foot of the cross.

I have so much more to tell you and show you.  The people are so hospitable here, the food has been excellent, and the coffee is almost worth a 10 hour airplane ride for.  So far, this has been an incredible, transformative journey for me and Deb.  I do miss you, and love you.  Sunday we will worship with our Anglican sisters and brothers in Nazareth whose liturgy in English and Arabic is very similar to ours.  Seven hours apart, our prayers will join each other as we give thanks to God together.  Know that you are in my prayers constantly as we visit these holy sites.

 

Announcements – 11/18/2018

Upcoming Events

November 21 – 7PM – Evensong & Fireside Reception (see announcement)
Bring a beverage or appetizer to share.

December 1 – 7:30AM-11AM – Pancakes with Santa (see announcement)
Bring the kids, and/or invite a neighbor with kids.

December 2 – The First Sunday of Advent
Lo! He comes on clouds descending.

December 9 – 10AM – Bishop’s visitation Sunday
Eight youth will be confirmed and one adult will be received!

December 10 – 5PM-9PM – East Parkside Dinner
Share a meal with our long-standing friends & neighbors.

December 16 – Pageant Sunday
Our children will tell the story of Christmas.

December 16-31 – Connect-by-night (see announcement)
Our homeless friends need a place to stay the last half of December.

Announcements

Worship

† Wednesday, November 21st, at 7:00 p.m. Evensong on Thanksgiving Eve. Following the service there will be a Fireside Reception in the Memorial Room (please bring a beverage and appetizer to share). RSVP to Judy Jervis at (610) 348-5529 or tuesbowler@outlook.com if attending reception.

† Bishop Gutiérrez will visit CHA on Sunday, December 9th for Confirmations, Receptions, and Reaffirmations.

† Morning Prayer is offered at 8:30AM on Sunday mornings.

Outreach

Pancakes with Santa: Saturday, Dec. 1st, 7:30 to 11:00 a.m. in the Parish Hall. Breakfast free for children 5 years old and younger. Ages 6-14 are $4. Ages 15 and up are $7. Baked goods will be for sale. Bring your own camera for pictures with Santa!

† Volunteers are needed to help with “Pancakes with Santa” (see announcement above). Opportunities to help: kitchen, set-up, clean-up, arts and crafts table, and bake sale table. Donations of baked goods and Christmas items to be sold are appreciated. If you would like to help, please contact Drew Meiers, Judy Jervis, or place your name on the sign up list in the Parish Hall.

† The East Parkside Citizens Association is celebrating their annual holiday party and has invited us to celebrate with them once again this year on Monday, December 10th, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. We will meet at the church at 5 p.m. to travel together, or you can come to Christ Community Baptist Church, 1224 N 41st St., Philadelphia PA 19104. We usually bring side dishes and will post a sign-up list in the Parish Hall. They are determining whom they will honor this year and will let us know how we can participate in that.

† The Connect by Night shelter program does not have a host for the month of December due to emergency repairs in one of their churches. After some careful consideration on the vestry, we have decided to offer to be their host for the last 2 weeks of the month over the holidays (December 16th-31st). They will use a combination of the Church and Parish Hall for accommodations during that time, and we will do our usual lunch preparation. We will post a sign-up list in the parish hall and online.

Children and Youth

† Nursery childcare is available during the 10:00 a.m. Sunday service for children ages 3 and younger in the Godly Play Room.

† Sunday School: Children Preschool – 2nd grade and 3rd – 8th grade attend Sunday classes at 10:00 a.m., the same time as the church service starts; children join their parents in the church in time for communion. Classes are held on the 1st, 3rd, & 4th Sundays of the month. On 2nd Sundays children attend church with their parents, either the 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist service or the 5:30 p.m. Family Worship Service. When there is a 5th Sunday, children attend church with their parents, with some of the children taking part in leading the service.

† Confirmation Class: November 25 at 5 p.m.

† The Holy Apostles Choir School pilot program will start February 5, 2019. It is an after-school program on Tuesday and Thursdays. Students, grades 1 – 5 will receive homework assistance and then study music using the Royal School of Church Music, Voice for Life curriculum. If your student is interested in participating in the program, please return the attached application to drstambaugh@gmail.com.

The Choir School will accept only 20 students for the pilot semester. Placement preference will be given to members of the Church of the Holy Apostles. More information is available at https://holyapostlespa.org/choir-school/. Please forward this information to friends and neighbors who may be interested. If a child needs transportation assistance, please contact drstambaugh@gmail.com.

Parish Life

† Parish Office hours for week of Thanksgiving:

+ 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 20

+ Normal hours resume the week of Nov. 26th.

Turkey Trot: 5K Run or 1 Mile Walk 9:00 a.m. Thanksgiving, Nov. 22nd, to raise money for the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania . (Meet in front of St. Faith Church, Havertown.) The fee is $20 or $10 for participants under 12. This event is held each year in memory of Matt Smyth who passed away from Testicular Cancer at age 23 and to remind men to check themselves. Make your donations payable to Abramson Cancer Center and in the memo put “The Matt Smyth Fund”.

Education

† Fall Reading: We finally received our copies of The Apostles’ Creed: A Guide to the Ancient Catechism by Ben Myers. Those of you who ordered a book, please pick them up. If you want, get started on reading it, and stay tuned as we figure out a time to discuss this wonderful book.

† Advent Soup Group

Like a Rolling Stone & The Rock That Doesn’t Roll: Stones in the Bible

Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m.

December 5th

December 12th

December 19th

Bible Study

Thursdays, 11:00 a.m.

Join us as we take a deep dive into the Acts of the Apostles

 

 

A Note from the Rector 10/7/18

Today we celebrate St. Faith’s day, the feast of the patron saint of St. Faith’s Episcopal Church in Havertown. Over the past several weeks, I have been writing in this space about our history. As an integral part of this, I write today about the history of St. Faith Episcopal Church. I will begin with St. Faith herself. Sometimes known as St. Foy, she was a young girl who lived in the Aquitaine region of France and was martyred for her faith in Jesus at the end of the 3rd or beginning of the 4th century (approx. AD 297-304). She was probably one of thousands of Christians martyred during the reign of the Roman Emperor Diocletian. According to St. Jerome, she was martyred by being made to lie down on a red hot brazier (notice the brazier depicted on the St. Faith’s Banner).

What follows is some of St. Faith’s parish history mostly from A History of the Diocese of Pennsylvania by Rev. J. Wesley Twelves.

St. Faith’s in Havertown began as a small community worshipping in private homes in 1930. The Rev. William Powell conducted services in the Brookline School House during 1932. In October 1932, the Convocation of Chester (now the Delaware Deanery)* decided to officially start a mission.

Ground was purchased on Brookline Boulevard and Allston Rd. With the help of the diocese a chapel building was erected in 1933. The Rev. William Powell was in charge of the mission until 1943. A parish house was added in 1934 and a rectory in 1937. The Rev. Aaron Manderbach served from 1945 to 1950. The mission assumed parish status in 1946. The Rev. Christopher J Atkins became rector in 1951, and the current church building was built in 1957.

St. Faith’s was closed in 2015. With prayer and discernment, many members of that congregation chose to move their membership to Holy Apostles. We are so glad they did. They have brought energy, dedication, and joy to our parish, along with their commitment to the Darby mission and other ministries. They have been inspiring, and truly life-giving to Church of the Holy Apostles. Though they are absolutely integral to us, and are part of this church in every way, we still desire to honor the legacy of St. Faith’s as an extraordinary place, and a spiritual home to many extraordinary people.

Besides the people (who are the true treasure of any church), we possess many of the treasured sacred vessels of St. Faith’s church some of which we are using today. These include the parish banner, processional cross, silver bread box, offering plates, and the brass Gospel book cover that we re-dedicate today as the St. Faith Gospel Book. This beautiful piece of artisanship depicts the symbols of the four Evangelists, with Christ Enthroned in Judgement in the center. It was originally given to St. Faith’s for the glory of God in 1982 by Janet Walens in memory of her mother, Veda McClenahan. I am very grateful that we can now cherish it together and use it to beautify our worship.

Finally, the Rev. Doris Rajagopal, missioner to Darby, is with us this morning. She was raised up for the ordained ministry at St. Faith’s. She is beginning to hold regular Eucharist services in Darby and needs some sacred vessels for this purpose. It is right and fitting that we share some of the St. Faith’s treasures (held by us in trust of the diocese) for her beautiful, on-going ministry to the borough of Darby.


*Our diocese is broken up into smaller geographical areas called deaneries, each led by a Dean.  The Delaware deanery covers much of Delaware county. Holy Apostles, right on the county line, is actually part of the Merion deanery.

 

This Week at Holy Apostles 10/7/18

Sunday, Oct. 7th 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer
20th Sunday after Pentecost 9 AM – Choir Practice
10 AM – Holy Eucharist
The Rev. James Stambaugh
preacher and celebrant
Sunday school & Nursery
Monday, Oct. 8th Parish offices closed
Tuesday, Oct. 9th 9:15 AM – Morning Prayer
10AM – 4PM – Parish office hours
Wednesday, Oct. 10th 9:15 AM – Morning Prayer
Thursday, Oct. 11th 9:15 AM – Morning Prayer
11 AM – Bible Study
Friday, Oct. 12th 9:15 AM – Morning Prayer
Sunday, Oct. 14th 8:30 AM – Morning Prayer
9 AM – Choir Practice
10 AM – Holy Eucharist
5 PM – Confirmation class
5:30 PM – Family Evening Worship

 

A Note from the Rector – July 1

Governance in the Episcopal church is unique.  One of its important aspects is General Convention, a once every three year gathering that serves as a bicameral legislative body for the church.  The two houses of General Convention are the House of Bishops, and the House of Delegates. The first General Convention was in 1785, two years before the formation of the U.S. Congress. William White, the first Bishop of Pennsylvania presided over the first General Convention.  The 79th General Convention convenes this year in Austin, Texas from July 5-13th.

Among the hundreds of resolutions that will be discussed and voted on this year are a several concerning the revision of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer.  There are two major options on the table. Option #1 details a 12 year process of comprehensive revision to the prayer book culminating in a vote to adopt a new Book of Common Prayer at General Convention 2030.  Option #2 calls for extensive research into how the current (1979) prayer book is actually being used, and the development of resources to help parishes better “live into” the spirituality of the current prayer book.  Option #2 also calls for translations of the current BCP into French and Haitian Creole, and for a better translation into Spanish (the current one is not very good).

There are also various proposals for “surgical changes” to the current prayer book.  One of the most noteworthy is a resolution to insert the rite for same-sex marriage into the prayer book after the current marriage rite, and to change the definition of marriage in the catechism at the back of the BCP.  The rite for same-sex marriage was approved for trial use at the 2015 General Convention, and has been used in most of the dioceses in the Episcopal Church with the express permission of the diocesan bishop. Bishops who do not allow their priests to use the same-sex marriage rite are supposed to make some provision for same-sex couples in their diocese to be married (i.e. asking another diocese to provide clergy, etc.).  Inserting the same-sex marriage rite into the current prayer book would make it uniformly available to all, and would circumvent the authority of bishops to approve or disapprove its use.

I am not going to predict how these resolutions to change the Book of Common Prayer will ultimately pan out.  I will say that I am convinced by arguments against the complete revision of the prayer book. I think it is true that most Episcopalians, including myself, have not fully internalized the deep spirituality and practice that is encoded in our prayer book.  It would behoove the Church to spend some more time opening up the riches of this truly remarkable book.  Of course, the prayer book isn’t perfect. That is one reason there are approved supplemental materials like the alternative translation of the Nicene Creed that that we have implemented at Holy Apostles every other week with Bishop Daniel’s permission.

I will try to stay abreast of what is going on in Austin, and keep you informed of developments of interest. I ask that you prayer for the Holy Spirit to guide all the delegates and bishops of our wonderful church as they convene for their important and difficult work.

If you want to browse the resolutions that will be taken up at General Convention click here.

You can also keep up with General Convention news at The Episcopal Herald.

A Note from the (Former) Rector: History of Connect-by-Night at Holy Apostles

by the Rev. Steve Snider (Rector 1991-2006)

We began sheltering circa 1994, I think it was, with a group of interdenominational parishes coordinated by an organization called Shepherd’s Place. Sally Griffith, now a parishioner of Holy Trinity Rittenhouse Square, alerted us to the organization and affected the marriage between CHA and Shepherd’s Place. We signed on and a core group of parish volunteers quickly expanded to the numbers you have today. I advocated and Sally was our first coordinator by default! She did a great job. Looking through the 2006 directory, the year I retired from CHA, I count 40+ families or individuals who stepped up to host and prepare bag lunches, drinks, sanitize, etc. Many of them are still helping today. I also remember our earliest volunteers now departed: Win Becker, Sr., Peter Cadwallader, Bonnie Davis, Ray Dyer, Bob & Carole Moore, Vince Raimondo, Harry Sibley, Sandy Smith, Gene Stivers, and I hope for forgiveness for missing anyone else.

Prior to our first year of hosting, we sent flyers around the neighborhood and the result was predictable. Some neighbors called to complain; some anonymously called the township resulting in a surprise inspection, albeit with an apology from the inspector; some called and offered to help. Ultimately, we had many more neighborhood helpers than complainers. After the first couple of years the nay-sayers stopped saying, well, ‘nay’.

When we first began, we were assigned winter months, and thus helped to save many from freezing on the streets. We needed to put a hold on our involvement in 1999 when the parish hall underwent re-construction. When we re-joined the rota for the month of July, which worked well since we had just installed air-conditioning in the parish hall.  We have been helping people avoid heat related catastrophes ever since.

At some point in the mid-90’s, Shepherd’s Place ceased to exist and the sheltering operation came under the auspices of Connect-By-Night social services in Upper Darby. Largely, CHA and other parishes hosted the overflow from the permanent shelter located at 63rd & Market in Upper Darby. That shelter was overwhelmed by the first year of its opening. At first our guests – numbering from 25 to 60 people each night – included children, most often with their mothers and sometimes with both parents/partners. In time, the children began to disappear for an assortment of reasons, some of them good.

I am so pleased and give thanks to God that CHA continues in this life-saving outreach. By my count 2018 marks the 24rd year in this sacred endeavor…anyway, that’s my story and I’m stickin’ to it.

Steve+

2018 Connect-by-Night Needs

This year, as part of our 24 year commitment to welcoming guests who are experiencing homelessness into our church community, the Sunday School is leading a donation drive for the following items:

Toiletries
Deodorant
Toothpaste
Washclothes
Toothbrushes
Shampoo

Lunch Supplies
Bread
Juice boxes
Jelly
Ham
Cheese
Pretzels (hard)
sandwich bags
brown paper bags
napkins

Announcements 4/15/18

This Week at Holy Apostles

Sunday, April 15th         10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II

Celebrant: The Rev. James Stambaugh, Rector                                                       

Monday, Apr.16th          Office Closed

Tuesday, Apr. 17th         9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer

10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Office Hours

Wednesday, Apr.18th   7:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist

Thursday, Apr. 19th      9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer

Friday, Apr. 20th           9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer

10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Office Hours

Sunday, Apr. 22nd      10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II

                                               Celebrant: The Rev. James Stambaugh, Rector

5:00 p.m. Confirmation Class

Announcements for Sunday, April 15th, 2018

Worship

Special worship services during the season of Easter:

Wednesday, April 25th – Feast of St. Mark the Evangelist: Holy Eucharist 6:00 p.m. (followed by Soup Group make-up discussion on Prayer)

Sunday, May 6th – Rogation Sunday: 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist; Rogation Procession after service (see announcement in Parish Life)

Thursday, May 10th – Feast of the Ascension: 7:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist

Sunday, May 20th – Feast of Pentecost: 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist

Children & Youth

Confirmation classes are being held the second and fourth Sundays of each month at 5:00 p.m.  All children and youth 5th grade and up (at parent’s discretion) are welcome to attend, even those who are not seeking confirmation.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR – BISHOP DANIEL GUTIERREZ WILL VISIT HOLY APOSTLES & CONFIRM ON SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9, 2018

April 29th is Youth Sunday, when children and teens in the church take part in leading the service. There is no Sunday School held that day, and children attend church with their parents.

Nursery Childcare is available during the 10:00 a.m. Sunday service for children ages 3 and younger in the Godly Play Room.

Sunday School classes (preschool – 2nd grade and 3rd – 8th grade) are held routinely on the 1st, 3rd, and 4th Sundays of the month, beginning at 10:00 a.m., the same time as the church service starts; children join their parents in the church in time for communion. On 2nd Sundays children attend church with their parents, either the 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist service or the 5:30 p.m. Family Worship Service. When there is a 5th Sunday, children attend church with their parents, with some of the children taking part in leading the service.

Adult Education

On Wednesday, April 25, we will hold a special Easter season “make-up day” for our Lenten study series on prayer.  It will begin with a Eucharist in honor of the Feast Day of St. Mark the Evangelist at 6:00 p.m., and then a soup and salad supper and discussion will follow.  The discussion will focus on tools for prayer such as prayer ropes, rosaries, and Icons.

Parish Life

Sunday, April 15th, at 4:00 p.m.: Centennial Organ Recital at Church Farm School Chapel of the Atonement will be held today. Among other performers will be Michael Stairs, one of the most accomplished organists in our area, Organist Emeritus at Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr, and organist for the Philadelphia Orchestra. The concert is free, and all are invited to a reception at Ned and Linda Sherrill’s home after the performance. Please see Nancy Haas for more information.

On Sunday April 22nd, the Penn Wynne Civic Association is hosting an Earth Celebration in Wynnewood Valley Park next door. This is a great chance for the church to be present to the neighborhood.  There will be a number of fun activities for children and families, and a member of our youth group will be part of a music performance.  1PM-5PM (Confirmation class will start at 5PM!)

On Saturday, May 5th, we are planning an ALL PARISH WORK DAY from 2PM-5PM.  We will work to clean and fix up the church, and then enjoy a taco dinner together.  Among other things, we are looking to clean up and re-open the bathrooms in the basement.  Come for as long as little as you can. The only expertise necessary is the ability to eat tacos.

On Sunday, May 6th, we will celebrate a parish Rogation Day. Rogation comes from the Latin word rogare, which means “to ask.” Since the 5th century the days leading up the Feast of the Ascension have been Rogation days specifically to ask for God’s protection and blessing over land, crops, waterways, and other places and things important to growing and agriculture.  On May 6th, immediately following the 10:00 a.m. service, there will be a Rogation procession from the church to the Wynnewood Valley Park next door for special prayers and blessings over the flora, fauna, and watershed that nourishes and beautifies our neighborhood.

If you visit the church during the week (and we hope you do!), please use the red double doors nearest the church offices.  Please take special care to lock doors behind you, and ensure that they latch properly.  Doors that are not locked or completely shut are a very serious safety concern for Little Friends Daycare.  Thank you!

This week the Parish Office will be open on Tuesday, April 17th, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., and on Friday, April 20th from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.